Earmarks Could Help Candidates in Midterms; Palin and Tea Party Connections Could Hurt

Aug 02, 2010

In the congressional elections this fall, candidates with a record of bringing government projects and money to their districts may have an edge. A majority of Americans (53%) say they are more likely to vote for a candidate with a record of delivering earmarks for their districts; just 12% say they would be less likely to vote for such a candidate. A third of the public (33%) says this would make no difference in their vote either way.

Far fewer say support from Barack Obama, Sarah Palin or affiliation with the Tea Party movement would make them more likely to vote for a candidate in this year’s congressional elections, according to the latest Pew Research/National Journal Congressional Connection poll, sponsored by SHRM, conducted July 29-August 1 among 1,003 adults. Americans are divided on the value of Obama campaigning for a candidate, while both Palin’s support and Tea Party affiliation are seen by more as negative than positive.

Read the full report, Earmarks Could Help Candidates in Midterms; Palin and Tea Party Connections Could Hurt on the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press' Web site.

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