Pew studies and analyzes issues at the intersection of religion and public affairs by conducting surveys, demographic analyses, and other research about the practice of religion and its place in American life.  Recent work includes a major portrait of Jews in America and interviews with 38,000 Muslims around the globe to provide a more complete understanding of the beliefs and political views of members of the world’s second- largest religion.

Our Work

View All Related News and Resources

Pew Research Center's Religion & Public Life Project » Publications

  • America’s Changing Religious Landscape

    • May 12, 2015

    The Christian share of the U.S. population is declining, while the share of Americans who do not identify with any organized religion is growing. These changes affect all regions in the country and many demographic groups. Read More

  • Event: The Future of World Religions

    • April 23, 2015

    Thursday, April 23, 10 A.M. to 11:30 A.M. The Pew Research Center’s new demographic projections– the first formal forecasts using data on age, fertility, mortality, migration and religious switching for the world’s eight major religious groups – finds that the religious profile of the world is rapidly changing. By 2050, the number of Muslims around […] Read More

  • The Future of World Religions: Population Growth Projections, 2010-2050

    • April 2, 2015

    As of 2010, nearly a third of the world's population identified as Christian. But if demographic trends persist, Islam will close the gap by the middle of the 21st century. Read More

  • In U.S., Pope’s Popularity Continues to Grow

    • March 5, 2015

    Nearly two years into his papacy, Pope Francis continues to be widely popular: Seven-in-ten Americans view him favorably, including 90% of U.S. Catholics. Read More

  • Latest Trends in Religious Restrictions and Hostilities

    • February 26, 2015

    Social hostilities toward religion declined in 2013, while government restrictions on religious beliefs and practices remained level. Harassment of Jews, however, reached a seven-year high. Read More