Pew studies and analyzes issues at the intersection of religion and public affairs by conducting surveys, demographic analyses, and other research about the practice of religion and its place in American life.  Recent work includes a major portrait of Jews in America and interviews with 38,000 Muslims around the globe to provide a more complete understanding of the beliefs and political views of members of the world’s second- largest religion.

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Pew Research Center's Religion & Public Life Project » Publications

  • Positive Impact of Pope Francis on Views of the Church, Especially Among Democrats and Liberals

    • October 7, 2015

    Pope Francis has generated goodwill toward the Catholic Church among many Americans across the political spectrum. But Democrats and liberals are especially likely to say they have a more positive view of the Church because of Francis. Read More

  • U.S. Catholics Open to Non-Traditional Families

    • September 2, 2015

    When Pope Francis arrives in the U.S., he will find a Catholic public that is remarkably accepting of a variety of non-traditional families, according to a new survey on family life, sexuality and Catholic identity. Read More

  • A Portrait of American Orthodox Jews

    • August 26, 2015

    Compared with most other Jewish Americans, Orthodox Jews on average are younger, get married earlier and have bigger families. They also tend to be more religiously observant and more socially and politically conservative. Read More

  • Gay Marriage Around the World

    • June 26, 2015

    A fact sheet provides an overview of the situation in the nations where same-sex marriage is legal nationwide as well as countries that allow it in certain jurisdictions. Read More

  • Catholics Divided Over Global Warming

    • June 16, 2015

    A solid majority of U.S. Catholics believe that Earth is warming. But climate change is a highly politicized issue that sharply divides American Catholics, like the U.S. public as a whole, mainly along political party lines. Read More