Pew Fellowships in the Arts Announce the 2007 Award Recipients: Twelve $50,000 Fellowships Are Given to Philadelphia-Area Artists

Contact: Cindy Jobbins, 215.575.4812, Melissa Franklin, Director, 267.350.4920


Philadelphia, PA - 06/11/2007 - Pew Fellowships in the Arts today announced the Philadelphia-area artists who have received $50,000 fellowship awards for 2007, the largest such grants in the country for which artists can apply. Pew Fellowships in the Arts is located at the Philadelphia Center for Arts and Heritage, which is funded by The Pew Charitable Trusts and administered by The University of the Arts. The goal of the program is to award outstanding artists who live and work in the five-county Philadelphia area, who have a demonstrated commitment and professional accomplishment within their field, and who will continue their artistic growth within the five-county Philadelphia area. The grants provide artists with economic freedom so that they have the opportunity to concentrate on their work over a considerable period of time-to explore, to experiment, and to develop it more fully. The program aims to provide such support at moments in artists' careers when a concentration on artistic growth and exploration is most likely to have the greatest impact on an artist's long-term personal and professional development. The 12 awards went to artists working in the areas of choreography, craft, and music composition. This year's recipients, selected from among nearly 200 artists, are:

  • Charles Anderson choreography
  • King Britt music composition
  • Nicole Cousineau choreography
  • Fritz Dietel craft
  • Ed Bing Lee craft
  • Gerald Levinson music composition
  • Adelaide Paul craft
  • Peter Paulsen music composition
  • Jamey Robinson music composition
  • Kate Watson-Wallace choreography
  • Dorothy Wilkie choreography
  • Julie York craft
The 2007 fellowships mark the 16th year of the Pew Fellowships in the Arts and brings the total amount that has gone to support some of the region's most gifted artists to $10.4 million. To date, 208 fellowships have been awarded and 213 artists who have been honored with the distinction of receiving the highly competitive fellowships. (Fellowships have been awarded to 3 collaborative teams over the years.) The biographies of all the artists are attached and visual material is also available on our web site at www.pewarts.org.

"It is exciting to see so many first-time applicants receive a fellowship along with those who have established themselves as leading artists in our community," notes Pew Fellowships in the Arts Director, Melissa Franklin, "Once again these selections demonstrate the richness and vitality of the Philadelphia region and this year's fellowship recipients reflect the diversity and creative energy that make Philadelphia's artists community one of the most exciting in the country. Our support of these gifted individuals will be rewarded manyfold in the contributions they make to the cultural life of this community and in the variety of artistic experiences they bring to the broader Philadelphia public."

The fellowships are for a minimum of one year and a maximum of two years. They support artists at any stage of career development, from early to mature, and working in a wide variety of aesthetics and traditions. Fellowships are awarded on a competitive basis and selections are made through a two-phase peer-review process involving preliminary and final selection panels. For the recipients, this honor reflects both their distinction within the discipline-specific pool and the collective judgment of the final, interdisciplinary panel. This year's interdisciplinary panel included:

  • Joseph V. Melillo (panel chair), executive producer, Brooklyn Academy of Music, N.Y.
  • Tanya Aguiñiga, furniture and accessories designer and maker, Los Angeles, Calif.
  • Michael Cain, pianist and composer, Brooklyn, N.Y. and professor of jazz studies and improvisation, New England Conservatory, Boston, Mass.
  • David McFadden, chief curator and vice president for programs and collections, Museum of Arts and Design, New York, N.Y.
  • Carla Peterson, artistic director, Dance Theater Workshop, New York, N.Y.
  • Sixto Wagan, co-executive director and performing arts curator, DiverseWorks, Houston, Tex.
  • Melinda Wagner, composer, Ridgewood, N.J.
Serving on the choreography panel were: Miguel Gutierrez, choreographer and artistic director, Miguel Gutierrez and the Powerful People, Brooklyn, N.Y.; Ishmael Houston-Jones, writer, curator, performer and coordinator, Lambent Fellowship in the Arts, New York, N.Y.; Carla Peterson, artistic director, Dance Theater Workshop, New York, N.Y. Serving on the Craft panel were: David McFadden, chief curator and vice president for programs and collections, Museum of Arts and Design, New York, N.Y.; Namita Gupta Wiggers, curator, Museum of Contemporary Craft, Portland, Ore.; Paula Owen, visual artist and president, Southwest School of Art & Craft, San Antonio, Tex. Serving on the Music Composition panel were: Michael Cain, pianist and composer, Brooklyn, N.Y. and professor of jazz studies and improvisation, New England Conservatory, Boston, Mass.; Michael Gordon, composer and co-artistic director, Bang on a Can, New York, N.Y.; Melinda Wagner, composer, Ridgewood, N.J. Panel biographies are available on our web site at www.pewarts.org.

"Our selection process is always extremely competitive and this year was not an exception," noted Franklin, "Our panelists labored with great seriousness and care to make the very difficult choices demanded by such a review process."

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