Panel Discussion - Genes in Uniform: Don't Test, Don't Tell

Contact: Mona Miller, 202.201.2135, Rick Borchelt, 202.663.5978


Washington, D.C. - 01/05/2006 - Upon enlisting in the military, recruits must provide DNA samples for a master military DNA repository, and must submit to genetic tests that can be used to make decisions about eligibility for service. Genetic information also can be used to determine eligibility for benefits in the event of a service member's medical discharge – benefits may be denied if the cause of the illness is determined to be of genetic origin. Current policies leave the military with immense discretion over how it will use the results of genetics tests at a time in which the number of diseases and conditions with known genetic bases are increasing rapidly. Please join the Genetics & Public Policy Center and former military personnel as they outline issues that surround military genetic testing. The seminar is on-the-record and open to the public.

Tuesday, January 10, 2006
Kenney Auditorium, Johns Hopkins University, 1740 Massachusetts Ave., N.W.
4:00 p.m., reception to follow

PANEL:
Ms. Susannah Baruch, Senior Policy Analyst, Genetics & Public Policy Center Dr. Mark Nunes, Clinical and Laboratory Geneticist, Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio (Major, retired, U.S. Air Force; Director, DNA Diagnostic Laboratory, Keesler Air Force Base Mississippi) Mr. Jay Platt, Drill Instructor (retired), U.S. Marine Corps

About GenePOPS

The Genetics Perspectives on Policy Seminars (GenePOPS) series is designed to explore and illuminate some of the critical issues at the intersection of human genetics and public policy. Hosted by the Genetics and Public Policy Center, which is part of Johns Hopkins University and supported by The Pew Charitable Trusts, GenePOPS will feature some of the nation's leading scientists, medical practitioners, policymakers, patient advocates, and ethicists as they discuss issues as wide ranging as genetic privacy, reproductive genetics, gene doping in sports, and safety and efficacy of commercial genetic tests.

Pew is no longer active in this line of work, but for more information, visit the Genetics & Public Policy Center Web site or visit the Genetics and Public Policy Centeron PewHealth.org.

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