Press Release

Report Predicts The Future Of The Internet

  • September 24, 2006

About

A survey of Internet leaders, activists, and analysts, conducted by the Pew Internet and American Life Project andElon University predicts the future of the Internet.

Their findings show that a majority agree with predictions that by 2020:

  • A low-cost global network will be thriving and creating new opportunities in a “flattening” world. 
  • Humans will remain in charge of technology, even as more activity is automated and “smart agents” proliferate. However, a significant 42% of survey respondents were pessimistic about humans' ability to control the technology in the future. This significant majority agreed that dangers and dependencies will grow beyond our ability to stay in charge of technology. This was one of the major surprises in the survey. 
  • Virtual reality will be compelling enough to enhance worker productivity and also spawn new addiction problems. 
  • Tech “refuseniks” will emerge as a cultural group characterized by their choice to live off the network. Some will do this as a benign way to limit information overload, while others will commit acts of violence and terror against technology-inspired change. 
  • People will wittingly and unwittingly disclose more about themselves, gaining some benefits in the process even as they lose some privacy. 
  • English will be a universal language of global communications, but other languages will not be displaced. Indeed, many felt other languages such as Mandarin, would grow in prominence.

At the same time, there was strong dispute about those futuristic scenarios among notable numbers of 742 respondents to survey conducted by the Pew Internet & American Life Project and Elon University. Those who raised challenges believe that governments and corporations will not necessarily embrace policies that will allow the network to spread to under-served populations; that serious social inequalities will persist; and that “addiction” is an inappropriate notion to attach to people's interest in virtual environments.

The experts and analysts also split evenly on a central question of whether the world will be a better place in 2020 due to the greater transparency of people and institutions afforded by the internet: 46% agreed that the benefits of greater transparency of organizations and individuals would outweigh the privacy costs and 49% disagreed.

Visit related Web site and databases -- Imagining the Internet.

Media Contact

Cindy Jobbins