About

Steve Ganey

Steve Ganey

  • Senior Director
  • Lands and Ocean,
  • The Pew Charitable Trusts
  • Oregon

Profile

Steve Ganey oversees Pew’s work in regional marine and fisheries conservation. He directs projects to encourage the sustainable management of ocean fisheries, prevent the destruction of aquatic habitat, and encourage an ecosystem-based approach to fisheries management and specific large marine ecosystems.

Ganey has more than a decade of experience in marine fisheries policy, research and advocacy. He headed the Regional Marine Conservation Project, for which he provided strategic direction and oversight for a variety of U.S. marine preservation advocacy projects; was a senior staff member for the Pew Oceans Commission; and served as a fisheries conservation specialist and campaign manager for the Alaska Marine Conservation Council.

Ganey holds a bachelor’s degree in sociology-anthropology from Ripon College and a master’s degree in environmental studies from Evergreen State College.

Recent Work

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  • Let’s Seize This Monumental Moment for New England’s Ocean Health

    On Wednesday, Sept. 2, more than 600 people packed a theater at Boston’s New England Aquarium to hear about the need to protect two of the region’s ocean treasures: Cashes Ledge and the coral canyons and seamounts area. Read More

  • The Bottom Line

    Lee Crockett's “Overfishing 101” blog provided an authoritative primer on federal fisheries policy. It also spotlighted historic milestones and celebrated success stories. His new series, “The Bottom Line,” will continue to explore fisheries management issues, while taking on other related subjects to provide a more in-depth look at the issues facing our ocean fish. With this blog, we hope... Read More

  • Let’s Protect Deep-Sea Ocean Floor Habitat Along the U.S. West Coast

    Mention the word “coral,” and images of tropical reefs, sunlit waters, and palm trees are likely to come to mind. But scientists are discovering that some of the world’s most lush and vibrant coral gardens lie thousands of meters beneath the ocean’s surface, where the temperature can be frigid and the light absent. These cold-water corals are even found more than 3... Read More

Media Contact

Justin Kenney

Senior Director, Communications

202.540.6537