Steve Ganey

Steve Ganey

  • Senior Director
  • Lands and Ocean,
  • The Pew Charitable Trusts
  • Oregon


Steve Ganey oversees Pew’s work in regional marine and fisheries conservation. He directs projects to encourage the sustainable management of ocean fisheries, prevent the destruction of aquatic habitat, and encourage an ecosystem-based approach to fisheries management and specific large marine ecosystems.

Ganey has more than a decade of experience in marine fisheries policy, research and advocacy. He headed the Regional Marine Conservation Project, for which he provided strategic direction and oversight for a variety of U.S. marine preservation advocacy projects; was a senior staff member for the Pew Oceans Commission; and served as a fisheries conservation specialist and campaign manager for the Alaska Marine Conservation Council.

Ganey holds a bachelor’s degree in sociology-anthropology from Ripon College and a master’s degree in environmental studies from Evergreen State College.

Recent Work

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  • Little Fish, Big Deal

    Forage fish—small, schooling prey species such as sardine, anchovy, and Pacific saury—provide food that sustains a multitude of marine life and are an economic driver for coastal communities. On the heels of a pivotal campaign victory to protect several species of forage fish in federal Pacific Ocean waters, Pew’s Pacific Ocean conservation campaign will host a public forum in... Read More

  • Final NOAA Rule Weakens Fisheries Protection

    Protecting U.S. fisheries from overfishing, and restoring populations of fish that are at unsustainably low levels, just got a little tougher. On Oct. 13, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries) announced a final version of guidelines to implement National Standard 1, which directs fisheries managers to prevent overfishing while attaining... Read More

  • 5 Reasons to Protect Steamboat Creek Watershed

    The Steamboat Creek watershed in the Umpqua National Forest lies a little more than 100 miles south of Eugene, Oregon, and provides clean drinking water, critical wildlife habitat, and world-class fisheries. The Frank Moore Wild Steelhead Sanctuary Designation Act would protect roughly 100,000 acres of land and water in the watershed for future generations to enjoy. Here are five reasons to... Read More

Media Contact

Andy Fisher

Senior Director, Communications