About

Kil Huh

Kil Huh

  • Director
  • State and Local Fiscal Health,
  • The Pew Charitable Trusts

Profile

Kil Huh directs Pew’s work on state and local fiscal health. He leads Pew’s work on state and local fiscal health and economic growth, which includes projects that seek to strengthen states’ fiscal planning and budgeting and how they use tax incentives for economic development, track and analyze states’ health care spending, and provide officials with analysis and insights on the financial conditions of America’s largest cities.

As the project lead, Huh oversees Pew’s work to inform state policy on a wide range of issues including state and local public sector retirement benefits, state tax systems, and housing finance. He also supervises a vigorous research portfolio that has contributed to federal and state legislation and has been cited widely in national media including, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, and NPR. Huh has appeared as a guest on Fox Business News, CBS Nightly News, and both PBS’s News Hour and Nightly Business Report.

Prior to joining Pew, he was most recently the director of policy and consulting at the Fannie Mae Foundation and previously manager of the foundation’s state and local initiatives.

He holds a B.S. in urban regional studies from Cornell University, a M.S. in urban planning from New York University and both a M.Phil. and a Ph.D. in urban planning from Columbia University.

Recent Work

View All
  • Fiscal 50: State Trends and Analysis

    Pew’s Fiscal 50: State Trends and Analysis presents 50-state data on key fiscal, economic, and demographic indicators and analyzes their impact on states’ long-term fiscal health. Drill down into state finances in five core areas. Read More

  • Fiscal 50: State Trends and Analysis

    Fiscal 50: State Trends and Analysis, an interactive resource from The Pew Charitable Trusts, allows you to sort and analyze data on key fiscal, economic, and demographic trends in the 50 states and understand their impact on states’ fiscal health. Read More

  • Size of Long-term Obligations Varies Across States

    States commit to future spending both when they borrow and when they fall short of funding the cost of retirement benefits for their public employees. As of fiscal year 2012, the largest of these long-term obligations was unfunded pension liabilities in 35 states, unfunded retiree health care costs in seven states, and public debt in eight states. Read More

Media Contact

Sarah Leiseca

Officer, Communications

202.540.6369