About

Barb Rosewicz

Barb Rosewicz

  • Director, Research
  • State Fiscal Health and Economic Growth,
  • The Pew Charitable Trusts

Profile

Barb Rosewicz is a research director in Pew’s state fiscal health project. She oversees “Fiscal 50: State Trends and Analysis,” an online resource that helps policymakers gain insights into key fiscal, economic, and demographic trends affecting their states.

Rosewicz supervises a research portfolio that enables comparisons, over time, of states’ tax revenue, spending, reserves, employment rates, and other issues important to long-term fiscal health. She leads a team of researchers and writers to produce Pew reports on a variety of topics critical to state and local fiscal health. These have included pension and retiree health care funding in cities, public attitudes toward state budget policy, and the early effects of the Great Recession on states.

She previously served as managing editor of Stateline, the daily news service of The Pew Charitable Trusts. Prior to joining Pew, Rosewicz was a reporter for The Wall Street Journal in Washington, D.C., and the Middle East and previously served as statehouse bureau chief in Topeka, KS, for United Press International.

She is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the University of Kansas with a bachelor of science in journalism.

Recent Work

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  • Fiscal 50: State Trends and Analysis

    Pew’s Fiscal 50: State Trends and Analysis presents 50-state data on key fiscal, economic, and demographic indicators and analyzes their impact on states’ long-term fiscal health. Drill down into state finances in five core areas. Read More

  • Fiscal 50: State Trends and Analysis

    Fiscal 50: State Trends and Analysis, an interactive resource from The Pew Charitable Trusts, allows you to sort and analyze data on key fiscal, economic, and demographic trends in the 50 states and understand their impact on states’ fiscal health. Read More

  • Size of Long-term Obligations Varies Across States

    States commit to future spending both when they borrow and when they fall short of funding the cost of retirement benefits for their public employees. As of fiscal year 2012, the largest of these long-term obligations was unfunded pension liabilities in 35 states, unfunded retiree health care costs in seven states, and public debt in eight states. Read More

Media Contact

Jeremy Ratner

Director, Communications

202.540.6507