Pew Fiscal Analysis Initiative

Pew's fiscal analysis initiative seeks to increase fiscal accountability, responsibility, and transparency by providing independent and unbiased information to policy makers and the public as they consider the major policy issues facing our nation. Together with outside experts from across the political spectrum, the initiative provides fiscal analysis and accessible information to inform the debate on these pressing concerns.

 

 

 



RECENT FISCAL FACT SHEETS:

 
 

 

Report

  • A Year or More: The High Cost of Long-Term Unemployment - 2012 Update

    May 02, 2012 - This addendum to the report, A Year or More: The High Cost of Long-Term Unemployment, looks at long-term unemployment using statistics from the first quarter of 2012 (the period from January to March).

  • Reducing the Deficit by Increasing Individual Income Tax Rates

    Mar 01, 2012 - This paper, written by the Tax Policy Center and sponsored by the Pew Fiscal Analysis Initiative, builds on previous work by examining whether raising just the top two or three individual income tax rates alone could put the debt on a sustainable path and what the rates would be under several different scenarios.

  • Implications of Different Bases for a VAT

    Feb 06, 2012 - Policy makers have discussed, and will likely continue to debate, the merits of implementing a value-added tax (VAT) as one option for reforming the tax system and/or addressing the federal budget deficit. This paper, written by the Tax Policy Center (TPC) and sponsored by the Pew Fiscal Analysis Initiative, examines the impacts of different VAT bases and how they vary among income and age groups. The analysis considers how different tax bases affect the VAT rate needed to reduce the deficit by 2 percent in 2015, its distributional burden, and effective marginal tax rates on different income sources.

  • Five Long-Term Unemployment Questions

    Feb 01, 2012 - This new series of charts illustrates different dimensions of the U.S. unemployment challenge, such as who make up the long-term unemployed population, where the long-term unemployed are located, and whether workers are being laid off permanently or temporarily.

  • Using a VAT to Reform the Income Tax

    Jan 24, 2012 - This paper is designed to help policy makers better understand the impact of a VAT if used to simplify the tax system. It analyzes a proposal by Michael Graetz, a Columbia University law professor and tax expert, that would introduce a VAT and reform the individual and corporate income tax systems.

  • Using a VAT for Deficit Reduction

    Nov 21, 2011 - This paper is designed to help policy makers better understand the impact of a VAT if used for deficit reduction. It compares adoption of a new VAT and higher income tax rates as alternative strategies for raising revenue to reduce the deficit. It looks at these two options in isolation from other policies such as spending cuts that also could contribute to deficit reduction and would allow for a lower VAT or smaller income-tax increases.

  • The Pew Budget Challenge

    Nov 15, 2011 - Tough choices are required to solve the debt crisis, as the Super Committee knows. Can you make them? Find out by taking the Pew Budget Challenge! Choose from more than 100 spending and tax policy options to reduce the national debt to a sustainable level of 60 percent of the GDP in the next 10 years.  

  • Addendum: A Year or More: The High Cost of Long-Term Unemployment - November 2011

    Nov 01, 2011 - The latest addendum to the Pew report, "The High Cost of Long-Term Unemployment", analyzes data from the third quarter of 2011.

  • Ten Charts Essential to Understanding the Federal Debt

    Oct 11, 2011 - The Pew Fiscal Analysis Initiative looks at challenges facing the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction by identifying policy decisions that have most significantly contributed to the nation’s debt crisis.

  • The Costs and Benefits of Housing Tax Subsidies

    Jun 30, 2011 - Research has attributed many economic and social costs and benefits to housing.  This study assesses one very targeted component of this complex issue--the fiscal costs and benefits of the housing subsidies that currently exist in the U.S. income tax system and the impact of several alternatives.  This analysis was commissioned by the Pew Fiscal Analysis Initiative and Subsidyscope—projects designed to inform the policy debate with non-partisan facts and analysis.  Pew has no position on this issue.  

  • Capitol Freeze: Fiscal Effects of Discretionary Spending Caps

    Apr 15, 2011 - The Pew Fiscal Analysis Initiative finds that the savings from recently proposed freezes would range widely, from $377 billion to $1.5 trillion over the next decade, depending on what they include and their timing. To better illustrate the savings from various proposals, Pew also created an online, interactive calculator to accompany the report that lets users set a variety of discretionary spending freeze parameters and immediately see their effect on the federal deficit and debt.

  • Methodology for Distributing a Value Added Tax (VAT)

    Apr 06, 2011 - “Methodology for Distributing a VAT” evaluates different approaches used by federal government agencies for determining the distributional burden of a VAT and proposes a new one that includes key improvements including differentiating between the burdens during the transitional period and once it is fully in place. The new methodology and upcoming series of VAT papers written by the Tax Policy Center (TPC) will provide the analysis and facts to inform the tax debate.  

  • Addendum - No Silver Bullet: Paths for Reducing the Federal Debt

    Mar 25, 2011 - In September 2010, the Pew Fiscal Analysis Initiative released "No Silver Bullet: Paths for Reducing the Federal Debt", which analyzed the implications of rising federal debt and modeled different remedies for reducing it to 60 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in fiscal years 2025 or 2035. Since then, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has updated its 10-year projections to reflect the most recent economic data as well as the cost of new legislation enacted after August 2010.  

  • Addendum: A Year or More: The High Cost of Long-Term Unemployment - January 2011

    Jan 27, 2011 - Pew’s Fiscal Analysis Initiative has released new statistics showing that as of December 2010, 30 percent of the 14 million Americans who were unemployed had been jobless for a year or more, according to data produced by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics. That percentage is the highest since World War II.  

  • Social Security Shortfall Warrants Action Soon

    Nov 09, 2010 - Social Security’s trustees estimate insolvency by 2037, a conclusion some have questioned. But in a new paper commissioned by Pew, bipartisan experts agree that the Social Security shortfall is real and that policymakers should act soon to fix it.

  • Addendum: A Year or More: The High Cost of Long-Term Unemployment - October 2010

    Oct 07, 2010 - Pew’s Fiscal Analysis Initiative has released new statistics showing that as of August 2010, 4.4 million people—roughly the population of Louisiana—had been out of work for a year or more; an increase of nearly 30 percent since December 2009.  In an update to the April 2010 report, A Year or More: The High Cost of Long-Term Unemployment, researchers also found that federal spending on unemployment benefits will total $160 billion in fiscal year 2010.  

  • No Silver Bullet: Paths for Reducing the Federal Debt

    Sep 30, 2010 - America’s federal debt is on a dangerous trajectory and, if no changes are made to federal spending and revenue, the U.S. debt will soon reach 95 percent of annual GDP. A new study by Pew’s Fiscal Analysis Initiative, No Silver Bullet, details what it will take to get the nation’s debt levels back on track and offers possible options moving forward. 

  • Addendum: Decision Time: The Fiscal Effects of Extending the 2001 and 2003 Tax Cuts

    Sep 02, 2010 - In May 2010, the Pew Fiscal Analysis Initiative released Decision Time: The Fiscal Effects of Extending the 2001 and 2003 Tax Cuts , which examined four options for extending the tax cuts. Since then, another option has attracted attention: extending the tax cuts for only two years to individuals making less than $200,000 and married couples earning less than $250,000. Pew’s analysis of the latest proposal finds that it would cost $387 billion, including interest costs, over the next decade. In contrast, a permanent extension of these tax cuts for the “middle class” (as defined in the President’s fiscal 2011 budget) would cost $2.2 trillion over the next decade, while extending the cuts for everybody would cost $3.3 trillion over the same period

  • Decision Time: The Fiscal Effects of Extending the 2001 and 2003 Tax Cuts

    Jun 24, 2010 - The income tax cuts of 2001 were enacted when the federal budget was running a surplus. The tax cuts of 2003, designed to boost the economy as it was showing signs of weakness, were approved before the federal debt rose to the top of the national agenda. Both sets of cuts are scheduled to expire at the end of 2010, and in the coming months Congress and the administration will have to decide whether to extend them at a time when the debt is climbing steadily but the economy remains fragile. (Click "Summary" to view the September 2, 2010 Addendum to the report.)

  • A Year or More: The High Cost of Long-Term Unemployment

    Apr 05, 2010 - Twenty-three percent of America’s unemployed have been jobless for a year or longer according to a study by the Pew Economic Policy Group. The report finds that having so many people of out of work for so long has had a significant impact on the federal budget.

Related Content

Media Coverage

E-Alerts & Newsletter

Stay updated with Pew News Now! We invite you to sign up to receive our weekly e-mail newsletter.

More Information

Staff

Ingrid Schroeder
Director

John Burrows
Administrative Assistant

Sara Bencic
Pew Leadership Fellow

 

 


Useful Links

White House Office of Management and Budget 
U.S. Census Bureau 
Congressional Budget Office
Bureau of Labor Statistics
The Joint Committee on Taxation
Federal Legislative Information - The Library of Congress (THOMAS) 

 

X
(All Fields are required)