State Health Care Spending

The State Health Care Spending Project, a collaboration between The Pew Charitable Trusts and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, is examining seven major areas of state health care spending—Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program, substance abuse treatment, mental health services, prison health care, active state government employee health insurance, and retired state government employee health insurance. The project will provide a comprehensive examination of each of these health programs that states fund. The programs vary by state in many ways, so the research will highlight those variations and some of the principal factors driving them. The project is concurrently releasing state-by-state data on 20 key health indicators to complement the programmatic spending analysis.

The Children’s Health Insurance Program

A 50-state examination of CHIP spending and enrollment.

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Our Work

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  • The Children’s Health Insurance Program

    The Children’s Health Insurance Program, a joint state-federal partnership, covered 8.1 million children at a cost of more than $13 billion in 2013. Since the program’s inception in 1997, CHIP has been administered in every state to provide health insurance to children who don’t qualify for Medicaid or have access to other forms of insurance. Further, CHIP has been instrumental... Read More

  • The Number of State and Federal Prisoners Age 55 and Older Increased by 234%

    The State Health Care Spending Project, a collaboration between The Pew Charitable Trusts and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, is examining seven major areas of state health care spending—Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program, substance abuse treatment, mental health services, prison health care, active state government employee health insurance, and retired state... Read More

  • Prison Population Continues to Age

    In 2013, the number of state and federal prisoners 55 or older continued to grow rapidly, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics. These inmates cost state prison health care systems, on average, at least two to three times that of other inmates. While correctional health care costs began declining in many states in 2010 and 2011, a steadily aging prison population could reverse this trend. Read More

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Michelle Blackston

Officer, Communications

202.540.6627