Outback Australia

Overview

The Pew Charitable Trusts works with Aboriginal people, scientists, conservation organisations, industry, and government agencies to conserve Australia’s critical natural landscapes and marine habitats. These efforts include advocating for the inclusion of new areas in the National Reserve System, such as national parks and Indigenous Protected Areas; the funding of conservation management activities; and the creation of sanctuaries for marine life.

Australia’s Outback is the country’s vast, wild, beautiful heartland. It is a region of stark contrasts, alternately lush and inhospitable. It supports people, jobs, and economies as well as a landscape rich in biodiversity and filled with some of the world’s most unusual plants and animals.

The Outback is one of the few large-scale natural regions left on Earth, and the oceans that surround Australia are no less exceptional. The waters off the Kimberley coast provide a large and healthy haven for sharks, dolphins, turtles, whales, and dugong—a mammal closely related to the manatee. In fact, approximately 9 out of 10 marine species found along the southwest coast live only in that area. The Coral Sea, next to the Great Barrier Reef, is one of the world’s last refuges for ocean giants such as tuna and billfish; its reef systems, such as the Osprey, remain healthy and intact.

Our Work

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  • 5 Big Environmental Wins of 2014

    One of the great challenges of our time is saving the natural environment and the rich array of life it supports on land and in the sea. Every day, Pew is working across the globe to preserve wilderness, restore biodiversity, and increase understanding of ocean ecology. In 2014, we joined our partners in celebrating successes around the world that will help conserve wildlife habitat and... Read More

  • The Jewel of the Kimberley, Western Australia’s Mitchell Plateau, Protected

    On March 24, in a major victory for conservation of the Kimberley region, the West Australian government and resources giant Rio Tinto announced a mining ban on the Mitchell Plateau, a celebrated part of the Outback. This agreement resulted from extensive negotiations between the WA government and Rio Tinto, which agreed to relinquish its long-held rights over the 175,000-hectare area. Read More

  • 'The Sea & Me'

    In late 2014, Australia’s government announced that it had suspended its world-leading network of marine sanctuaries and would review both the science and the initial arguments behind the network’s designation—despite more than 10 years of scientific assessment and 750,000 submissions in support of high numbers of sanctuaries. Read More

Creating a Modern Outback

Media Contact

Paul Sheridan

Manager, Communications

+61.410.516.656