About

Barry Traill

Barry Traill

  • Director
  • Outback Australia,
  • The Pew Charitable Trusts
  • Australia

Profile

Barry (B.J.) Traill directs Pew’s work in Australia, where he works with partner organizations to obtain protection for large wilderness areas in Australia on land and sea.

Before joining Pew, Traill worked for 25 years as a conservation advocate and scientist for Australian state and national organizations. He dealt with private land conservation issues with Trust for Nature, Victoria and on public land conservation issues with the Victoria National Parks Association, Environment Victoria and the Wilderness Society. He was instrumental in establishing nationally coordinated work on the protection of Australian woodlands, including legislation that sharply reduced deforestation rates in Australia. He was a founder of the Northern Australia Environment Alliance and the Invasive Species Council.

Traill holds a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in terrestrial ecology from Monash University in Melbourne, Australia.

Recent Work

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  • 5 Big Environmental Wins of 2014

    One of the great challenges of our time is saving the natural environment and the rich array of life it supports on land and in the sea. Every day, Pew is working across the globe to preserve wilderness, restore biodiversity, and increase understanding of ocean ecology. In 2014, we joined our partners in celebrating successes around the world that will help conserve wildlife habitat and... Read More

  • The Jewel of the Kimberley, Western Australia’s Mitchell Plateau, Protected

    On March 24, in a major victory for conservation of the Kimberley region, the West Australian government and resources giant Rio Tinto announced a mining ban on the Mitchell Plateau, a celebrated part of the Outback. This agreement resulted from extensive negotiations between the WA government and Rio Tinto, which agreed to relinquish its long-held rights over the 175,000-hectare area. Read More

  • 'The Sea & Me'

    In late 2014, Australia’s government announced that it had suspended its world-leading network of marine sanctuaries and would review both the science and the initial arguments behind the network’s designation—despite more than 10 years of scientific assessment and 750,000 submissions in support of high numbers of sanctuaries. Read More

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Paul Sheridan

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