Arctic Standards for Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling

Collected resources on improving safety and preventing spills in the U.S. Arctic Ocean

Arctic Standards for Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling

On July 7, 2016, the federal government issued final rules for offshore oil and gas exploration in the U.S. Arctic Ocean. These Arctic-specific standards were developed to address the region’s remoteness and weather conditions, which are much more challenging than those in the temperate waters where most of the country’s offshore drilling occurs.

Learn more about how these strong standards can prevent spills and protect the people and ecosystems of the Arctic.

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The Challenging and Remote Arctic

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The Challenging and Remote Arctic

Industrial development in the Arctic Ocean comes with the risks of operating in some of the harshest conditions and most remote locations on the planet.  In February 2015, the federal government proposed new rules for offshore oil and gas companies to improve safety and prevent spills. Here are some of the key challenges in the U.S. Arctic Ocean, and Pew’s recommendations for handling them.