Technology has changed how people consume news, as well as the process of gathering it.  Information is now almost instantaneous and available anywhere in the world.  And news has been democratized so that voices outside the mainstream can be heard.

This is healthy for democracy but is an earthquake for the business of journalism.  Newspaper circulation is dropping, newsroom staffs are shrinking, and ad revenue is declining.  Pew tracks these changes through its annual state of the news media reports, providing fact-based analysis of the growth of digital news sites, the purchase of major journalism institutions by entrepreneurs, the use of mobile devices to access news, the mixing of news and marketing through sponsor-generated content, and other trends in journalism.

Recent Work

February 26, 2020 Most say journalists should be watchdogs, but views of how well they fill this role vary by party, media diet

Nearly three out of four U.S. adults say that, in general, it’s important for journalists to function as watchdogs over elected officials.

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February 19, 2020 Concern about influence of made-up news on the election is lowest among those paying the least attention

Concern is highest among people who follow political news most closely, older adults and those who display more knowledge about politics in general.

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February 12, 2020 Confidence in public acceptance of election results connects to following political news, relying on social media

Americans who closely follow political news are more likely to have confidence that the public will accept election results. And that's true across party boundaries.

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February 5, 2020 A sore subject: Almost half of Americans have stopped talking politics with someone

Democrats are more likely than Republicans to have stopped discussing political and election news with someone: 50% vs. 41%, respectively.

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January 29, 2020 An oasis of bipartisanship: Republicans and Democrats distrust social media sites for political and election news

Both Democrats and Republicans express far more distrust than trust of social media sites as sources for political and election news.

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January 24, 2020 Acknowledgments

The Election News Pathways project was made possible by The Pew Charitable Trusts. Pew Research Center is a subsidiary of The Pew Charitable Trusts, its primary funder. This initiative is a collaborative effort based on the input and analysis of the following individuals.

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January 24, 2020 Methodology

 American Trends Panel survey methodology The American Trends Panel (ATP), created by Pew Research Center, is a nationally representative panel of randomly selected U.S. adults. Panelists participate via self-administered web surveys. Panelists who do not have internet access at home are provided a tablet and wireless internet connection. The panel is being managed by Ipsos. […]

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January 24, 2020 Views about Ukraine-impeachment story connect closely with where Americans get their news

Many Democrats and Republicans hold divergent views of President Donald Trump's withholding of military aid to Ukraine. But in today’s fragmented news media environment, party identification may not be the only fault line.

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