Trust Magazine

How the U.S. Changed Over the Past Decade

End note

In this Issue:

  • Spring 2020
  • How States Are Innovating to Meet Today’s Challenges
  • The Loss of Local News
  • Wildlife Crossings Can Protect Migrating Animals
  • The Coronavirus Pandemic
  • The Next Great Idea
  • A New President and CEO for Pew
  • Noteworthy
  • In the Beginning Was the Word
  • How Autonomous Vehicles Could Affect State Budgets
  • Market-Based Regional Agreements Can Help Achieve Large-Scale Marine Conservation
  • Largely Unexplored Chilean Patagonia Needs Protections
  • Property Taxes Sink Farmland Owners
  • A Pledge to Do More
  • Why Public Opinion Polls Don't Include the Same Number of Republicans and Democrats
  • Successful Shark Conservation in the Pacific
  • Return on Investment
  • How the U.S. Changed Over the Past Decade
  • View All Other Issues
How the U.S. Changed Over the Past Decade
The Pew Charitable Trusts

 

Over the past decade, the United States has experienced technological advancement, demographic shifts, and major changes in public opinion. Here’s a look at how the Pew Research Center documented the evolution of a decade.

 

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Pew Research Center

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Pew Research Center

A nonpartisan fact tank that informs the public about the issues, attitudes and trends shaping the world. It conducts public opinion polling, demographic research, media content analysis and other empirical social science research.

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