Strong Support For Watchdog Role, Despite Public Criticism Of News Media

Strong Support For Watchdog Role, Despite Public Criticism Of News Media

The press is coming under considerable fire these days. News organizations are facing a crippling financial crisis and public views of the accuracy of news stories have fallen to their lowest level in more than two decades, according to a recent Pew Research Center survey.

Nonetheless, most Americans continue to support the so-called "watchdog role" for the press. In fact, the percentage of Americans saying that press criticism of political leaders keeps them "from doing things that should not be done" is nearly as high now – at 62% – as it was in Pew Research's first poll in 1985 (67%) when views of the news media were far less negative than they are today.

In 15 surveys since that initial poll, majorities have said that press criticism of political leaders keeps them from doing things that should not be done. Support for the press's watchdog role has continued even as positive views of press performance have plummeted. In Pew Research's most recent survey of press attitudes, released Sept. 13, just 29% said that news organizations get the facts straight; in 1985, nearly double that percentage (55%) said news stories were accurate.

Read the full report Strong Support For Watchdog Role, Despite Public Criticism Of News Media on the Pew Research Center's Web site.

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