Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

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Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

President’s Message on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

We know that in America and around the globe, people of color, LGBTQ individuals, women, people of faith, and others have been discriminated against and disadvantaged. The multitude of perspectives offered by our staff and our partners has always been integral to our work, but today we must be more intentional in our efforts to focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) as core elements of our operations and culture. At Pew, our journey involves direct and candid conversations across the organization about how we can do better. And we’ve coupled those conversations with concrete action plans to make progress. We know we have more work ahead and remain committed to listening, learning, documenting disparities, and advancing together.

Some of the steps we’ve taken recently include:

  • Created a DEI department, which includes our vice president and two additional staff members, to help guide and support our efforts.
  • Begun incorporating DEI in the Trusts’ research and policy projects.
  • Broadened and deepened the Pew Research Center’s research agenda focused on race and ethnicity to explain differences in the full spectrum of the American experience, including economics, family, work, politics, technology, identity, and faith.
  • Initiated an intercultural development inventory for staff.
  • Expanded benefits to support our staff, including in the U.S. 16 weeks of paid family leave and observation of Juneteenth. Additionally, we broadened our definition of domestic partners to include all partnerships.
  • Worked harder to ensure that our hiring and management practices expand diversity and eliminate bias by taking steps such as counting work experience in lieu of education and using panel interviews and competency-based questions to mitigate implicit bias.  

Another way we can advance DEI is by sharing information about the diversity of our teams, which is provided below. This demographic information reflects the genders, races and ethnicities, and ages of our staff members as of June 30, 2022.

We will continue to report on our progress in terms of how we are doing at Pew and in our broader mission to make a difference for our communities.

Susan K. Urahn
President and CEO

Workforce Demographics

Data as of June 30, 2022

To view information about staff demographics for our subsidiary, the Pew Research Center, please visit pewresearch.org

Figure 1: Generational Representation (Global): Our workforce spans four generations, with our largest population being Millennials, who were born between 1981 and 1996. The average age of staff is 42.5. For reporting purposes, The Pew Charitable Trusts defines generations using birth year ranges assigned by the Pew Research Center. Figure 2: Gender Across Levels (Global): Our workforce continues to be composed predominantly of women, with women representing 52.4% of our executives and 62.6% of staff. Figure 3: Race and Ethnicity Across All Levels (U.S.): Among our executives (vice president and above), 66.7% identify as White, 19.0% as Black or African American, and 14.3% as Asian. Of our U.S.-based staff members, 63.8% identify as White, 15.1% as Black or African American, 9.3% as Asian, 5.0% as Hispanic or Latino, 3.3% as two or more races, 0.2% as Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, 0.1% as American Indian or Alaska Native, and 3.1% chose not to disclose.
Pew workers between meetings.
Pew workers between meetings.

Careers

Our people are driven by a passion to improve outcomes for the public in a wide range of topics and specialties.

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Careers

With Philadelphia as our hometown and the majority of our staff located in Washington, Pew attracts top talent—people of integrity who are service-oriented and willing to take on challenging assignments. We provide competitive pay and benefits, a healthy work-life balance, and a respectful and inclusive workplace. Pew employees are proud of their colleagues, proud of where they work, and proud of the institution's reputation. As a result, our U.S. and international staff find working at Pew personally and professionally rewarding.

sue urahn
sue urahn
Trust Magazine

Notes from the President

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Notes from the President

Rebecca Rimel joined Pew in 1983 as health program manager, became executive director five years later, and accepted her current position in 1994. During her tenure, Pew has evolved from a grant-making organization to become an entrepreneurial, global non-profit dedicated to serving the public. With the board’s guidance, Ms. Rimel has led the organization’s expansion from fewer than 10 employees to more than 750 located throughout the United States and around the globe.