In Virginia, Healthy Shorelines and Coastal Economies Rely on State Program

Projects along ocean, estuaries, rivers, and Chesapeake Bay benefit communities and nature

In Virginia, Healthy Shorelines and Coastal Economies Rely on State Program

Although Virginia has only 132 miles of ocean coastline, the figure jumps to 7,345 miles when the commonwealth’s tidal shoreline—along its inlets, estuaries, and share of the Chesapeake Bay—also is counted. This gives Virginia one of the longest coasts of any state.

Shorelines shape and support the communities they border. Recreation, tourism, commercial and recreational fishing, and other coastal-dependent businesses are critical to these areas’ economies. In addition, healthy coastal habitats mitigate damage to communities from storms, flooding, and sea level rise, and improve water quality.

In Virginia, the Coastal Zone Management (CZM) Program involves a consortium of organizations that work to conserve the commonwealth’s coastal resources and foster sustainable development. Below are some of the many ways the commonwealth’s CZM program and its partner organizations sustain and support Virginia’s coastal areas.

Joseph Gordon directs The Pew Charitable Trusts’ campaigns to protect marine life on the U.S. East Coast. Zack Greenberg coordinates Pew’s outreach and policy efforts in this region.

Laura McKay
Laura McKay
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As Threats Rise to Virginia’s Coast, State Works To Protect Habitats and Communities

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As Threats Rise to Virginia’s Coast, State Works To Protect Habitats and Communities

Virginia’s 5,000 miles of coastline are home to a variety of habitats, many of them critical to wildlife, coastal communities, and the state’s economy. To learn more about these areas, Pew spoke to Laura McKay, who leads Virginia’s Coastal Zone Management (CZM) Program.

The front facade of the Supreme Court of the United States in Washington, DC.
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Agenda for America

A collection of resources to help federal, state, and local decision-makers set an achievable agenda for all Americans

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Data-driven policymaking is not just a tool for finding new solutions for emerging challenges, it makes government more effective and better able to serve the public interest.

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States of Innovation

Data-driven state policy innovations across America

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Data-driven policymaking is not just a tool for finding new solutions for difficult challenges. When states serve their traditional role as laboratories of innovation, they increase the American people’s confidence that the government they choose—no matter the size—can be effective, responsive, and in the public interest.