BLM Plans Reveal Troubling Trend

BLM Plans Reveal Troubling Trend
Hiker on Ridge
Nate Wilson

The federal Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is responsible for the preservation, maintenance, and use of a quarter of a billion acres of public lands across the United States. Every two decades, the agency revises its management plans for each of the more than 100 planning areas—designated regions that it oversees. In 2019, BLM released draft plans for the upcoming 20-year period. The Pew Charitable Trusts reviewed the plans and found troubling trends that could result in the loss of protection for millions of acres of public land. The proposals would fail to conserve lands that the agency’s own research has deemed worthy of protection and would remove decades-old safeguards, leaving only a fraction of the areas appropriately conserved and opening vast swaths to energy and mineral development.

USPLR
USPLR
Article

Millions of Acres of Public Lands Could Lose Protections

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Article

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) oversees a quarter of a billion acres of public lands across the nation—more than any other federal agency. These places range from the boreal forest of the wild Alaskan interior to the panoramic red rock country of the Colorado Plateau, and from ancient Pacific Northwest forests to biologically rich sage-steppe ecosystems that are a hallmark of the inland West.

Grand Staircase-Escalante
Grand Staircase-Escalante
Article

BLM Moves to Allow Mining and Drilling on Lands Cut from Utah National Monument

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BLM Moves to Allow Mining and Drilling on Lands Cut from Utah National Monument

The colorful hoodoos, slot canyons, cliffs, and plateaus of southern Utah’s panoramic canyon country attract visitors and researchers from across the globe. Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, designated in 1996, is known as the “Science Monument" because of the extensive research opportunities it affords.

Idaho
Idaho
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Wildlife—and Its Habitats—at Risk Under BLM Plan

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Wildlife—and Its Habitats—at Risk Under BLM Plan

In southwestern Idaho, the Snake, Boise, Payette, and Weiser rivers course through mountains, desert, and brush—areas of widespread public lands that are popular among a wide range of outdoor enthusiasts.

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