Serve the Country, Save the Parks

Episode 26

Serve the Country, Save the Parks

In this episode

More than a third of America’s national parks are battlefields, cemeteries, and other sites that honor our military veterans. But those 156 landmarks are awaiting $6 billion in needed repairs—accounting for nearly half of the National Park Service’s $11.6 billion maintenance backlog. Host Dan LeDuc talks with two former service members about the peace, pride, and purpose they find at their favorite NPS sites, and why more funding is needed to restore America’s national parks.

Related Resources

Veterans Come to DC to Urge Protection of our National Parks

National Park Service Turns to Partnerships to Tackle Repairs

Let’s Restore America’s National Parks

America’s National Parks: Upkeep Required

Gettysburg National Military Park

Vicksburg National Military Park

Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park

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