Impacts of Federal Policy on Clean and Efficient Distributed Generation Technologies

Impacts of Federal Policy on Clean and Efficient Distributed Generation Technologies

The Pew Charitable Trusts and the Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Association hosted a webinar Nov. 19 for the Clean Energy Business Network titled “Impacts of Federal Policy on Clean and Efficient Distributed Generation Technologies.”

Dale Louda, executive director of the CHP Association, gave welcoming remarks, and Phillips Hinch, senior economic policy adviser in the office of Representative Tom Reed (R-NY), provided an update on the Power Efficiency and Resiliency (POWER) Act (H.R. 2657/S. 1516), a bill that would improve the investment tax credit for distributed generation and industrial energy efficiency technologies, such as CHP and waste heat to power. Jessica Lubetsky, a manager with Pew’s clean energy initiative, discussed the findings of the new report Cleaner, Cheaper, Stronger: Industrial Efficiency in the Changing Utility Landscape. Finally, Michael Fucci, an associate on distributed energy resources with ICF International, discussed the modeling used in the report to examine how various policy options may affect future deployment of industrial energy efficiency technologies. 

Download slides from the webinar. 

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