Public Attitudes on Election Administration

Public Attitudes on Election Administration

Technology is changing election administration across the nation. To help election officials better understand what voters know and don't know, The Pew Charitable Trusts conducted surveys in eight states with the help of Public Opinion Strategies and the Mellman Group. These surveys assessed whether voters support use of technology in elections, including interstate data sharing such as that offered by the Electronic Registration Information Center (ERIC). Here is what our surveys found out about voter opinions.

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Election Data Dispatches provides data, research and analysis about election administration in the U.S. While we link to external research data and other materials, we neither independently verify them, endorse the reports, nor affirm the authors' opinions.

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