Pew Comments on Offshore Angler Permit Proposal

Pew Comments on Offshore Angler Permit Proposal

On behalf of The Pew Charitable Trusts, Chad W. Hanson, Officer of the U.S. Oceans Southeast,  submitted comments to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission regarding the proposed Gulf Offshore Recreational Fishing Permit (offshore permit). 

In the letter, Hanson states, "We support the Commission in developing this offshore permit and would like to see it ready for full implementation by 2015. Requiring the permit for all adult anglers who target reef fish species - as is currently proposed - is an important component to ensure this program is truly effective in providing improved data on recreational catch of reef fish species. However, we feel this approach would be improved by also including the full suite of species managed in the reef fish complex, which we discuss in more detail below."

Download the full letter below.

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