National HIA Meeting 2012

Building Capacity for HIA at the State and Local Levels

National HIA Meeting 2012

OVERVIEW

A number of avenues have been explored to build lasting HIA capacity at the state and local levels. CDC, RWJF and the Health Impact Project have funded several models over the years. This panel will explore the lessons learned, challenges and opportunities from those initiatives.

Moderator: Arthur Wendel, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Jae Douglas, Oregon Health Authority

State & Local Health Agencies, Training & Capacity Building (PDF)

Maya Pack, South Carolina Institute of Medicine & Public Health

State & Local Health Agencies, Training & Capacity Building (PDF)

Kenneth Smith, National Association of County and City Health Officials

City & County Health Departments HIA Mentorship Program (PDF)

Holly Avey, Georgia Health Policy Center, Georgia State University

Tapping HIA Potential through the National Network of Public Health Institutes (PDF)

The front facade of the Supreme Court of the United States in Washington, DC.
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Agenda for America

A collection of resources to help federal, state, and local decision-makers set an achievable agenda for all Americans

Quick View

Data-driven policymaking is not just a tool for finding new solutions for emerging challenges, it makes government more effective and better able to serve the public interest. In the coming months, President Joe Biden and the 117th Congress will tackle a number of environmental, health, public safety, and fiscal and economic issues—nearly all of them complicated by the COVID-19 pandemic. To help solve specific, systemic problems in a nonpartisan fashion, Pew has compiled a series of briefings and recommendations based on our research, technical assistance, and advocacy work across America.

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States of Innovation

Data-driven state policy innovations across America

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Data-driven policymaking is not just a tool for finding new solutions for difficult challenges. When states serve their traditional role as laboratories of innovation, they increase the American people’s confidence that the government they choose—no matter the size—can be effective, responsive, and in the public interest.