En este número:

  • Winter 2022
  • A New Generation's Ocean Literacy
  • Coastal Blue Carbon
  • How to Reverse the Ocean-Climate Crisis
  • How We Can Avoid the 'Danger Zone' of Climate Change
  • How We Can Help Marine Protected Areas Save Our Ocean
  • Indigenous Knowledge Is Essential for the Future of the Ocean
  • Our Ocean Is Choking on Plastic
  • The Global Ocean
  • When Too Many Boats Chase Too Few Fish
  • Pew.Feature.Toolbar.ViewAllOtherIssues
Winter 2022
Illustration of boats and fish in water
Illustration of boats and fish in water
Trend Magazine

When Too Many Boats Chase Too Few Fish

The long history of government subsidies to fishing fleets has led to a decline in many fisheries over the last half-century

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Trend Magazine

In the aftermath of World War II, millions of people were starving. With this humanitarian imperative, governments set out to build fishing fleets.

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Trend Magazine

How to Reverse the Ocean-Climate Crisis

It’s not enough to slow emissions of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere; we must also remove some of what’s already there

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Trend Magazine

It’s not enough to slow emissions of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere; we must also remove some of what’s already there..

Plastic bottles under water
plastic bottles
Trend Magazine

Our Ocean Is Choking on Plastic

A new analytical tool can show the main sources of plastic pollution and help governments determine how to best reduce the amount that is reaching the ocean.

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Trend Magazine

Our ocean—all 140 million square miles of it—has a plastic pollution problem. This is the case in places where one might expect it—from the waters lapping at megacities to the world’s most polluted river deltas—but also in areas that might surprise people, such as the deepest trenches in the sea and the world’s most remote coastlines.

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Trend Magazine

How We Can Help Marine Protected Areas Save Our Ocean

A new 'whole ocean' approach to ocean conservation can serve marine life and people around the globe

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Trend Magazine

In January 1790, a ship named The Bounty landed on a small speck of land jutting out of the Pacific Ocean. The uninhabited island, barely 2 miles long and 1 mile wide, would remain home to the crew and their subsequent generations until this very day. The fact that The Bounty dropped anchor in such a small and desolate place was no accident—its isolation was its attraction. The crew were mutineers and they never wanted to be found.

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Trend Magazine

Coastal Blue Carbon

Why saving our coastlines is crucial to saving the ocean—and the planet

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Trend Magazine

Why saving our coastlines is crucial to saving the ocean—and the planet.

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE

after the fact

Podcast

Conservation Across Generations

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Podcast

In this episode, we speak with Ashlan Cousteau and Philippe Cousteau Jr., who, inspired by the legacy of Philippe’s grandfather, undersea explorer Jacques Cousteau, have dedicated their careers to ocean conservation.

Podcast

Cultivating Conservation

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Podcast

In this episode, we explore how communities that rely on a healthy ocean are working to create marine protected areas (MPAs) to preserve biodiversity—and their livelihoods.

Podcast

A Wildlife Refuge On The Brink

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Podcast

Scientists have forecast an increase of as much as 2.1 feet in the Chesapeake Bay by 2050.

Podcast

The Impacts of Climate Change

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Podcast

Amid growing public concern about rising seas, extreme weather, and disappearing biodiversity, we speak with Michael Oppenheimer, the Albert G. Milbank professor of geosciences and international affairs at Princeton University and a longtime participant in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the United Nations body for assessing the science related to climate change. He explains the science behind the planet’s changing environment, its effects on the ocean, and possible solutions to avoid “the climate danger zone.”

Podcast

Preventing Ocean Plastic Pollution

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Podcast

We continue our “Ocean, People, Planet” season with a discussion of one of the largest threats facing the ocean: plastic pollution. Winnie Lau, who is the project director of Pew’s preventing ocean plastics project, and Richard Bailey, professor of environmental systems at Oxford University, discuss ways to reduce the amount of plastic entering the ocean and highlight a new analytical tool that nations can use to take action.

Podcast

The State of Our Ocean With Callum Roberts

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Podcast

In this new series, “Ocean, People, Planet,” we focus on the connection between the health of the ocean and the health of the planet.

Podcast

The State of Our Ocean With Sheila (Siila) Watt-Cloutier

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Podcast

In Part II of “The State of Our Ocean,” we speak with Sheila (Siila) Watt-Cloutier, an environmental, cultural, and human rights advocate, about the value of the ocean to the Inuit in the Arctic.

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Saving Our Marsh: Protecting Blackwater Wildlife Refuge
On the shores of the Chesapeake sits Blackwater Wildlife Refuge, 32,000 acres of land that waterfowl and other migrating birds depend on. But more than 5,000 acres of land have disappeared due to sea level rise. Marcia Pradines Long is the Project Leader and Refuge Manager, and she shares how climate change has impacted this area and the species that call it home. 

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Why We Must Protect Our Ocean
The ocean has never needed more protection than it does now. But with solutions from data, science, and traditional knowledge, we can make a difference to safeguard this vital resource for generations to come.

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Our Ocean's Future
The globe is mostly ocean, yet less than 3 percent is fully or highly protected. Facing urgent threats, much more is needed to sustain our blue planet’s future. Coastal communities, along with ocean advocates and experts from around the world, are leading the effort protect our great global commons. They discuss what it will take to keep our ocean healthy for generations to come

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Global Challenges 
Plastic pollution. Climate change. Rising sea levels. Our planet depends on a healthy ocean, and our ocean faces urgent challenges. Hear from ocean advocates, researchers, and experts about what's happening to our ocean—and innovative approaches for global problems.

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How Climate Change Impacts Indigenous Lands
Near the eastern shore of Maryland, the Nause-Waiwash people have lived in harmony with their land for years. This land and the species that calls it home are now threatened by rising sea levels. According to Chief Donna Wolf Mother Abbott, "Mother Earth is in distress." Chief Abbott tells the story of her community and how they have been impacted by climate change. She explains what it'll take to protect their ancestral land for future generations.