How Kentucky Is Keeping Kids Out of Court

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Kentucky’s youth diversion program has helped children across the commonwealth stay out of court and remain with their families while improving public safety and saving taxpayer dollars—showing that investing in communities over courts benefits everyone. What’s more, Kentucky’s approach has drastically reduced the number of Black youths within their system, which allows courts to intentionally focus on the pervasive racial and ethnic disparities that persist within the system today.

"The changes involved do good for the children involved and can change the path of your state for the better," Kentucky state Senator Whitney Westerfield (R) shares in an interview with The Pew Charitable Trusts.

Watch the full video to learn more about this model and how the following leaders are addressing the racial and ethnic disparities within their state's juvenile justice system: Pastor Edward L. Palmer Sr., District Court Judge John Lindsey Adams, Sen. Westerfield, and director of the Office of Statewide Programs Rachel Bingham.

Learn more about how to improve the juvenile legal system.

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