Protecting East Antarctica and the Southern Ocean

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In addition to millions of penguins, East Antarctica is home to sea spiders the size of dinner plates, bright jelly fish, and other bottom dwelling sea creatures that make the waters resemble a coral reef. For millions of years, this mosaic of marine life has been kept isolated from the outside world because of circumpolar currents. Unfortunately, concentrated fishing, climate change, and other threats are taking a toll on Antarctica.

CCAMLR, the world’s governing body for Southern Ocean conservation, is currently reviewing long overdue protections in the area. Up for consideration are new marine protected areas in East Antarctica, the Weddell Sea, and the Antarctic Peninsula.

Learn more about protecting Antarctica’s Southern Ocean.

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