Oregon’s Owyhee Canyonlands Need Protection

Pew urges Senate subcommittee to safeguard one of the Lower 48’s largest intact landscapes

Oregon's Owyhee Canyonlands Need Protection

The Pew Charitable Trusts submitted a written statement to the Senate Energy and Natural Resource Subcommittee on Public Lands, Forests, and Mining expressing support for the Malheur Community Empowerment for the Owyhee Act. The bill, which was the subject of a Dec. 1, 2022 hearing, would protect the Owyhee Canyonlands in southeastern Oregon, return land to the Burns Paiute Tribe, and support local economic development, among other benefits.

The Owyhee is home to more than 200 species of wildlife and has some of the darkest skies in the Lower 48 because of its remote location. For decades, Oregonians from throughout the state have been working together to protect this exceptional area.

Owyhee
Article

Five Reasons to Protect the Owyhee Canyonlands

Quick View
Article

The southeastern Oregon section of the Owyhee Canyonlands, which also stretches into southwestern Idaho, has clean, fish-filled rivers and some of the most intact wildlife habitat left in the Lower 48 states—two reasons scientists say that this area “presents a significant opportunity to conserve key elements of native biodiversity and ecological function.”

Oregon
Article

5 Reasons to Protect Public Lands in Southeastern Oregon

Quick View
Article

In Malheur County, Oregon, nestled along the border with Idaho and Nevada, rest 5 million acres of spectacular canyons and desert. Most of this area—4.6 million acres—falls under the purview of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), which is expected to release a draft plan soon on how the land is to be used for the next two decades.

America’s Overdose Crisis
America’s Overdose Crisis

America’s Overdose Crisis

Sign up for our five-email course explaining the overdose crisis in America, the state of treatment access, and ways to improve care

Sign up
Quick View

America’s Overdose Crisis

Sign up for our five-email course explaining the overdose crisis in America, the state of treatment access, and ways to improve care

Sign up