News Interest Index: Employment News Seen As Overwhelmingly Bad

News Interest Index: Employment News Seen As Overwhelmingly Bad

Americans by a wide margin say they are hearing mostly negative news about the nation's job situation, though they are more likely to sense a mix of good and bad news about other elements of the economy.

With the jobless rate climbing, seven-in-ten (71%) say they are hearing mostly bad news about the employment picture. About a quarter (27%) say they are hearing a mix of good and bad news, while just 1 percent say they are hearing mostly good news. Perceptions of news about prices, financial markets and real estate values are more mixed.

Looking at what people are hearing about the economy as a whole, 2009's upward trend toward a greater mix of good and bad economic news has come to a stop. Six-in-ten (59%) say they are hearing a mix of good and bad news, down from 64% in May. In December 2008, shortly after the fall financial meltdown, just 19% said they were hearing a mix of good and bad news.

In addition, the latest weekly News Interest Index survey, conducted June 12-15 by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, shows that the share that says they are hearing mostly bad news is up from 31% in May to 37%. In December, 80% said they were hearing mostly bad news.

Read the full report Employment News Seen As Overwhelmingly Bad on the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press' Web site.

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