The State of Families in Philadelphia, 2019

The State of Families in Philadelphia, 2019
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Lexey Swall

Overview

Forty-nine percent of Philadelphia’s households are families, and 47 percent of those families include children under 18, while 26 percent are living below the poverty line, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Over the past few years, the city has aimed to increase the availability of high-quality prekindergarten education. Census data show that 53 percent of Philadelphia’s 3- and 4-year-olds were enrolled in pre-K as of 2017, and PHLpreK—a program created by the Kenney administration—has introduced 2,500 city-funded seats. Affordable pre-K can help parents have higher earnings while saving on child care.

Meanwhile, local births to teenage mothers have declined by 64 percent over the past decade, although the birthrate remains higher than the national average on a per capita basis.

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Agenda for America

Resources for federal, state, and local decision-makers

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Data-driven policymaking is not just a tool for finding new solutions for emerging challenges, it makes government more effective and better able to serve the public interest.

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States of Innovation

Data-driven state policy innovations across America

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Data-driven policymaking is not just a tool for finding new solutions for difficult challenges. When states serve their traditional role as laboratories of innovation, they increase the American people’s confidence that the government they choose—no matter the size—can be effective, responsive, and in the public interest.

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Philadelphia’s Poor: Experiences From Below the Poverty Line

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In this report, The Pew Charitable Trusts examines the attitudes and personal experiences of poor Philadelphians, exploring several key aspects of life that are affected by, and potentially helping to perpetuate, poverty— including health outcomes, employment prospects, exposure to crime, and access to quality schools.