The State of Commuters in Philadelphia, 2019

The State of Commuters in Philadelphia, 2019
Schuylkill Expressway
Lexey Swall

Overview

In Philadelphia, nearly a quarter of all commutes to work involve public transportation, one of the highest percentages in the nation. Roughly 40 percent of working Philadelphians reverse commute, meaning they travel to the suburbs and beyond for their primary jobs; this percentage is about average for large U.S. cities. In terms of commute time, Philadelphians’ trips are slightly longer than in some peer cities.

 
  
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Reverse Commuting in Philadelphia Mirrors Other Large Cities

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Philadelphia-area residents driving the Schuylkill Expressway and Interstate 95 at rush hour might get the idea that a lot of workers living in the city travel to jobs outside its borders. And on several occasions in recent years, civic leaders have framed the amount of reverse commuting as a sign of weakness in the local economy.