The Broadband Gap—Who’s Not Online in America Today

Episode 80

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The Broadband Gap—Who’s Not Online in America Today

Story: In this episode of “Restoring Community,” we travel to the Kinship Community Food Center, based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. We hear from the center’s executive director, Vincent Noth, about how he transformed a former community pantry into a gathering place, and residents share their experiences finding fellowship, belonging, and connection through food. 

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Stat: 21 million: The number of Americans not connected to broadband internet, according to the Federal Communications Commission.

Story: While most Americans are managing remote work, learning, and even participating in social gatherings online during the pandemic, there are still millions of Americans who don’t have access to high-speed internet where they live. Kathryn de Wit, manager of Pew’s broadband research initiative, explains who’s not online and shares what some states and communities are doing to bridge connectivity gaps.

Related resources:

Progress Made by States in 2019 Is Key to Increasing Broadband

21 Million Americans Still Lack Broadband Connectivity

53% of Americans Say the Internet Has Been Essential During the COVID-19 Outbreak

Digital gap between rural and nonrural America persists

About a quarter of rural Americans say access to high-speed internet is a major problem

State Broadband Policy Explorer

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Who's Not Online in America Today?

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Having access to reliable, high-speed internet is not a reality for many millions of people across the United States. With so many of Americans’ day-to-day tasks—such as learning and working—relying on broadband access, what are communities doing to get more people connected?

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