Student Loans: Who Is Struggling to Pay and Why?

Episode 65

Student Loans: Who Is Struggling to Pay and Why?

Stat: 1 million—the number of Americans who default on student loan payments each year.

Story: More Americans are seeking higher education, which means more people are taking on—and struggling with—student loan debt. For one first-generation college graduate, the complex repayment system proved overwhelming. We share her story and talk to Chronicle of Higher Education reporter Eric Kelderman and Pew researcher Sarah Sattelmeyer about key challenges and potential solutions to help keep borrowers on track.

Related Resources:

5 Facts About Student Loans

Coordination Between Federal Agencies Would Help Millions Pay Back Student Loans

4 Things You Should Know About Student Loan Repayment 

Who Struggles Most to Repay Student Loans?

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