Food Safety in Restaurants: How Much Do You Know?

Test your smarts on the meals we eat out

Food Safety in Restaurants: How Much Do You Know?
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With about 60 percent of Americans eating at a restaurant at least once a week, safety in these establishments is key to reducing foodborne illness outbreaks. Recently, Clostridium perfringens, a pathogen that occurs when food is left at an unsafe temperature, and Cyclospora, a pathogen that is spread by people ingesting food or water contaminated with feces, have been linked to meals served by restaurants.

As we mark National Food Safety Education Month, see how much you know about the risks—and efforts to reduce them—when eating out.

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