National HIA Meeting 2013: Plenary Panel – Evaluation of Health Impact Assessments: Early Results from Four HIA Evaluation Studies

National HIA Meeting 2013: Plenary Panel – Evaluation of Health Impact Assessments: Early Results from Four HIA Evaluation Studies

OVERVIEW

Few studies have systematically evaluated HIAs to understand what they are accomplishing, and what factors may be associated with success. This session presents early results from four separate HIA evaluation studies, including three conducted in the United States and one conducted in Australia and New Zealand. Speakers will offer insights into topics, including the value and impact of conducting HIAs, factors that contribute to success, and opportunities to strengthen the practice.

Moderator:

Andrew Dannenberg, University of Washington School of Public Health

Presentations:

Andrew Dannenberg, University of Washington School of Public Health

The Effectiveness of HIA in Australia and New Zealand 2005 – 2009 (PDF)

Diana Charbonneau, Center for Community Health & Evaluation –Group Health

Impact and Success of HIAs – Highlights From a Nationwide Evaluation (PDF)

Keshia Pollack,  Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Impacts of Health Impact Accessments: A Multiple Case Study of the U.S. Experience (PDF)

Arthur Wendel, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Endeavors in Health Impact Assessment Evaluation (PDF)

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