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Gulf of Mexico Ocean Conservation

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Gulf of Mexico Ocean Conservation
Ocean Health in the Gulf of Mexico

Since 2008, Pew has advocated for sustainable fishing, habitat conservation, and other measures that protect vital marine resources in the Gulf of Mexico. 

Pew championed science-based catch limits and promoted the rebuilding of struggling fish populations, including gag grouper, greater amberjack, and red snapper. Pew’s other work in the region included helping to establish enhanced systems for collecting fishing data and new protections for ancient, fragile deep-sea coral ecosystems, which face threats that include damaging fishing gear, oil spills, and ocean acidification. In Florida, Pew helped launch a research program to study forage fish—the small, schooling, nutrient-rich prey species upon which many marine animals depend, including birds, whales, dolphins, and fish such as tarpon, grouper, and snook.

Together with scientists, managers, fishermen, and conservationists, Pew helped pave the way for a more comprehensive approach to fisheries management.

In 2019, Pew expanded its commitment to ocean conservation in the U.S. by enhancing its focus on essential coastal habitats. Read more about this ongoing work at Conserving Marine Life in the U.S.— Gulf Coast page. 

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Conserving Marine Life in the U.S. – Gulf Coast

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Conserving Marine Life in the U.S. – Gulf Coast

The Gulf of Mexico is an environmental and economic powerhouse. Its 600,000 square miles are home to some of the nation’s most productive fishing grounds and oyster beds as well as deep-sea corals and the country’s largest continuous seagrass beds.

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The Magnuson-Stevens Act at 40

Reasons major U.S. fishing law should shift to big picture management

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On April 13, 2016, the Magnuson-Stevens Act, the primary law that governs fishing in U.S. ocean waters, turns 40.

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