Shark Attack Survivor: Paul de Gelder, 34, Sydney, Australia

Paul de GelderA bull shark grabbed de Gelder by his arm and leg when the navy diver was on a training exercise in Sydney Harbor in 2009. He tried to fight back but was pulled under water and violently shaken. Then suddenly the shark ripped off de Gelder's arm and leg. De Gelder nearly died, spent two months in a hospital, and faced enormously challenging rehabilitation.

But today, de Gelder is fitted with state-of-the-art prosthetics and is back on the job. He is the author of “No Time for Fear,” an inspirational book about his experiences. As a shark conservation advocate, he believes everyone has an obligation to protect sharks and the important role they play in the ecosystem. De Gelder was among a group of shark attack survivors who joined the Pew Environment Group in 2010 to press the United Nations for improved shark conservation measures.

Click to learn more about other shark attack survivors.

National Homeownership Month

Article

37 Researchers Working to Transform Biomedical Science

Quick View
Article

Biomedical researchers are on the front lines of scientific innovation. From responding to global pandemics to pioneering lifesaving cancer treatments, these researchers push past scientific boundaries to solve pressing health challenges. For nearly 40 years, The Pew Charitable Trusts has supported more than 1,000 early-career biomedical scientists committed to this discovery.

Composite image of modern city network communication concept

Learn the Basics of Broadband from Our Limited Series

Sign up for our four-week email course on Broadband Basics

Quick View

How does broadband internet reach our homes, phones, and tablets? What kind of infrastructure connects us all together? What are the major barriers to broadband access for American communities?

Pills illustration
Pills illustration

What Is Antibiotic Resistance—and How Can We Fight It?

Sign up for our four-week email series The Race Against Resistance.

Quick View

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria, also known as “superbugs,” are a major threat to modern medicine. But how does resistance work, and what can we do to slow the spread? Read personal stories, expert accounts, and more for the answers to those questions in our four-week email series: Slowing Superbugs.