Technology has changed how people consume news, as well as the process of gathering it.  Information is now almost instantaneous and available anywhere in the world.  And news has been democratized so that voices outside the mainstream can be heard.

This is healthy for democracy but is an earthquake for the business of journalism.  Newspaper circulation is dropping, newsroom staffs are shrinking, and ad revenue is declining.  Pew tracks these changes through its annual state of the news media reports, providing fact-based analysis of the growth of digital news sites, the purchase of major journalism institutions by entrepreneurs, the use of mobile devices to access news, the mixing of news and marketing through sponsor-generated content, and other trends in journalism.

Recent Work

October 2, 2019 Americans Are Wary of the Role Social Media Sites Play in Delivering the News

Getting news from social media is an increasingly common experience; nearly three-in-ten U.S. adults do so often.

The post Americans Are Wary of the Role Social Media Sites Play in Delivering the News appeared first on Pew Research Center's Journalism Project.

August 14, 2019 Older Americans, Black Adults and Americans With Less Education More Interested in Local News

Nearly a third of U.S. adults (31%) follow local news very closely, but local news does not play an equally vital role for all Americans. Older Americans, black adults and those with a high school education or less show considerably more interest in local news than their counterparts, according to a new analysis from Pew […]

The post Older Americans, Black Adults and Americans With Less Education More Interested in Local News appeared first on Pew Research Center's Journalism Project.

July 23, 2019 Public Broadcasting Fact Sheet

Hundreds of local and regional radio and television stations comprise the U.S. public media system.

The post Public Broadcasting Fact Sheet appeared first on Pew Research Center's Journalism Project.

July 23, 2019 Digital News Fact Sheet

In the U.S., roughly nine-in-ten adults (93%) get at least some news online (either via mobile or desktop), and the online space has become a host for the digital homes of both legacy news outlets and new, “born on the web” news outlets.

The post Digital News Fact Sheet appeared first on Pew Research Center's Journalism Project.

July 9, 2019 Hispanic and Black News Media Fact Sheet

News media made by and for the two largest racial/ethnic minority groups in the United States – blacks and Hispanics – have been a consistent part of the American news landscape.

The post Hispanic and Black News Media Fact Sheet appeared first on Pew Research Center's Journalism Project.

July 9, 2019 Audio and Podcasting Fact Sheet

The audio news sector in the U.S. is split by modes of delivery: traditional terrestrial (AM/FM) radio and digital formats such as online radio and podcasting.

The post Audio and Podcasting Fact Sheet appeared first on Pew Research Center's Journalism Project.

July 9, 2019 Newspapers Fact Sheet

Newspapers are a critical part of the American news landscape, but they have been hit hard as more and more Americans consume news digitally.

The post Newspapers Fact Sheet appeared first on Pew Research Center's Journalism Project.

June 25, 2019 Network News Fact Sheet

Network TV news – appointment viewing for many Americans – saw its audience decline over the past year.

The post Network News Fact Sheet appeared first on Pew Research Center's Journalism Project.