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Housing Policy Initiative

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Housing Policy Initiative

June is National Homeownership Month

Thanks for joining Pew in highlighting the role housing policies play in building strong communities.

National Homeownership Month

Did you know 60% of Americans are concerned about the current state of the housing market?

An illustration of a couple holding hands walking away from an outline of houses behind them
An illustration of a couple holding hands walking away from an outline of houses behind them
Podcast

Pathways to Homeownership: Housing in America

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Podcast

In this episode, Alex Horowitz and Tara Roche, directors of The Pew Charitable Trusts’ housing policy initiative, join us to discuss some of the challenges—and how to overcome them—for those pursuing homeownership.

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man walks past a For Rent sign
Short Reads

Key Facts About Housing Affordability in the U.S.

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Short Reads

Key Facts About Housing Affordability in the U.S.

Trust Magazine

The High Cost of Putting a Roof Over Your Head

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Trust Magazine

Across the country in the wide expanses of Montana, it was easy less than a decade ago to find a comfortable family home in Bozeman for $250,000. Today, many of those same houses sell for more than $600,000, with prices often driven up by people moving in from more expensive states who have sold a house and have ready cash to buy what they want.

Article

Minneapolis Land Reform, a Blueprint for Housing Affordability

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Article

Minneapolis was once among the cities whose zoning policies prevented sufficient housing construction. In the early 2000s, the city maintained strict requirements related to parking, land use, and building height, width, and bulk. Then rising housing costs prompted policymakers to rethink their zoning rules.

June is National Homeownership Month

Join us as we advocate for policies that promote equitable access to homeownership.

Housing is the largest regular expense for most Americans. But a record housing shortage and skyrocketing rents and home prices mean millions of Americans now struggle to afford housing.

The Pew Charitable Trusts’ housing policy initiative works to help policymakers reimagine their approach to housing by illuminating how regulations and statutes drive the housing shortage and rising costs. Strict zoning and land-use regulations have limited the availability of homes, especially lower-cost options such as apartments and townhouses, which could otherwise help meet the nation’s housing demand. At the same time, outdated financial regulations have prevented millions of creditworthy homebuyers—especially Black, Hispanic, and Indigenous people, and those in rural communities—from obtaining a mortgage to finance a low-cost home, pushing many borrowers into riskier and more costly alternative financing arrangements.

Pew studies the ways that policymakers can increase housing availability and safe home financing by revising land-use regulations that have reduced housing supply and increased costs, improve access to small mortgages—those under $150,000—and make non-mortgage financing arrangements safer for homebuyers.

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36 million Americans

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36 million Americans have used alternative financing at some point to pursue homeownership. TWEET

30%

Rents rose by 30% from Jan. 2017 to Jan. 2023. TWEET
An illustration of a couple holding hands walking away from an outline of houses behind them
An illustration of a couple holding hands walking away from an outline of houses behind them
Podcast

Pathways to Homeownership: Housing in America

Quick View
Podcast

In this episode, Alex Horowitz and Tara Roche, directors of The Pew Charitable Trusts’ housing policy initiative, join us to discuss some of the challenges—and how to overcome them—for those pursuing homeownership.

Quick View
Trust Magazine

The High Cost of Putting a Roof Over Your Head

Quick View
Trust Magazine

Across the country in the wide expanses of Montana, it was easy less than a decade ago to find a comfortable family home in Bozeman for $250,000. Today, many of those same houses sell for more than $600,000, with prices often driven up by people moving in from more expensive states who have sold a house and have ready cash to buy what they want.

Article

How Housing Costs Drive Levels of Homelessness

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Article

A new analysis of rent prices and homelessness in American cities demonstrates the strong connection between the two: homelessness is high in urban areas where rents are high, and homelessness rises when rents rise.

OUR WORK

Financing a Low-Cost Home Should Be Easier

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Homeownership is the largest source of wealth for most American families, and obtaining a safe, traditional 15-to-30-year mortgage is a key step toward achieving financial security. But outdated housing policies and financial regulations have made small mortgages—those for homes priced under $150,000—expensive for lenders and unavailable for millions of qualified and creditworthy borrowers, especially Black, Hispanic, and Indigenous households and those in rural communities.

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Why Do Millions of U.S. Homebuyers Use Risky Financing Options?
Short video describes challenging path to homeownership