Our Blue Planet–Protecting the Ocean

Episode 6

Our Blue Planet–Protecting the Ocean

In this episode

Three-quarters of our planet is covered with water—and it’s this water that sustains life. But our liquid planet, home to half of the world’s known creatures and plants, is facing multiple threats, such as overfishing and commercial development. That’s why leading scientists say that 30 percent of our oceans should be protected. Host Dan LeDuc explores why this 30 percent data point is important with two people committed to safeguarding the oceans: native Hawaiian Sol Kaho’ohalahala, whose culture and livelihood depend on sustainable seas; and Matt Rand, who directs the Pew Bertarelli Ocean Legacy Project and has been working with people like Kaho’ohalahala since 2006 to keep our oceans healthy.

Related Pew Research

Science Is Clear: More Large Marine Parks Will Help Species—and Our Ocean

Marine Protected Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction

Pew Bertarelli Ocean Legacy Project

Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument Expansion

Underwater Treasures of the High Seas

Hawaii’s Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument

The High Seas Need Protection Now

Bertarelli Foundation

Episode transcript (PDF)

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