As recently as 1995, 42 percent of American adults said they had never heard of the Internet.  Today, use of the Internet is pervasive at home, work, and on mobile devices.

It is a primary source of news, information, entertainment, and social interaction.  To understand its evolution, Pew conducts surveys and qualitative research that tracks and analyzes how Americans use digital technology, and the ways in which online activity affects their families, communities, health, educational pursuits, politics, and workplace activities.

Recent Work

April 7, 2021 Methodology

The analysis in this report is based on telephone interviews conducted Jan. 25-Feb. 8, 2021, among a national sample of 1,502 adults, 18 years of age or older, living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia (300 respondents were interviewed on a landline telephone, and 1,202 were interviewed on a cellphone, including […]

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April 7, 2021 Acknowledgments

This report is a collaborative effort based on the input and analysis of the following individuals. Find related reports online at pewresearch.org/internet. Primary researchers Brooke Auxier, Former Research AssociateMonica Anderson, Associate Director, Research Research team Lee Rainie, Director, Internet and Technology ResearchAndrew Perrin, Research AnalystEmily A. Vogels, Research Associate Editorial and graphic design Margaret Porteus, […]

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April 7, 2021 Social Media Use in 2021

A majority of Americans say they use YouTube and Facebook, while use of Instagram, Snapchat and TikTok is especially common among adults under 30.

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February 18, 2021 Acknowledgments

We are extremely thankful for the contributions of the people who participated in this canvassing.  This report is a collaborative effort based on the input and analysis of the following individuals.   Primary researchers  Janna Anderson, Director, Elon University’s Imagining the Internet Center  Lee Rainie, Director, Internet and Technology Research Emily A. Vogels, Research Associate   Editorial and graphic design  […]

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February 18, 2021 About this canvassing of experts

This report is the first of two to come in 2021 that will share results from the 12th “Future of the Internet” canvassing by the Pew Research Center and Elon University’s Imagining the Internet Center. Experts were asked to respond to several questions via a web-based instrument that was open to them from June 30-July […]

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February 18, 2021 3. Hopes about life in 2025

While they anticipate an array of problems in the years ahead, these experts offered hope on a notable number of fronts over the next five years. It wasn’t just the optimists who said they see the near future as promising in many regards; most of the respondents who predicted digital life is likely to be […]

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February 18, 2021 2. Worries about life in 2025

Whether they expressed optimistic or pessimistic views about the “new normal” in 2025, these respondents also weighed in with their worries for the near future of humans and digital technologies. Their views embraced several overarching themes that can be summed up in one: The advantaged enjoy more advantages; the disadvantaged fall further behind. Much of […]

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February 18, 2021 1. Emerging change

A large share of expert respondents in this canvassing expect some already evident trends to extend and expand through 2025. They said the greatest needs include more refined and responsive global governance of the complex systems on which people depend, as telemedicine, telework, tele-learning and tele-life spread. These dependences will increase demands for expansion of […]

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