Technology has changed how people consume news, as well as the process of gathering it.  Information is now almost instantaneous and available anywhere in the world.  And news has been democratized so that voices outside the mainstream can be heard.

This is healthy for democracy but is an earthquake for the business of journalism.  Newspaper circulation is dropping, newsroom staffs are shrinking, and ad revenue is declining.  Pew tracks these changes through its annual state of the news media reports, providing fact-based analysis of the growth of digital news sites, the purchase of major journalism institutions by entrepreneurs, the use of mobile devices to access news, the mixing of news and marketing through sponsor-generated content, and other trends in journalism.

Recent Work

September 28, 2020 Methodology

This report – a study of news on YouTube – uses three different research components and methodologies, including a national representative survey of U.S. adults conducted through Pew Research Center’s American Trends Panel (ATP) and a content analysis of YouTube channels and the news videos they produced. Survey The American Trends Panel (ATP), created by […]

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September 28, 2020 Acknowledgments

This report was made possible by The Pew Charitable Trusts. Pew Research Center is a subsidiary of The Pew Charitable Trusts, its primary funder. This report is a collaborative effort based on the input and analysis of the following individuals. Find related reports online at journalism.org. Galen Stocking, Senior Computational Social Scientist Patrick van Kessel, […]

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September 28, 2020 2. A closer look at the channels producing news on YouTube – and the videos themselves

Complementing the survey results in the previous chapter, this section of the report is based on a different approach to data collection. Rather than asking people about their experiences with news on YouTube, researchers used both computational tools and human coders to examine some of the attributes of the most popular YouTube news channels and […]

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September 28, 2020 1. YouTube news consumers about as likely to use the site for opinions as for facts

YouTube is one of the most popular online platforms in the United States. About seven-in-ten Americans (71%) say they use it, including roughly a quarter of all U.S. adults (26%) who get news there.4 The video-sharing site has become a place for journalists, commentators, news organizations, and others to publish a wide range of content, […]

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September 16, 2020 Methodology

The American Trends Panel survey methodology The American Trends Panel (ATP), created by Pew Research Center, is a nationally representative panel of randomly selected U.S. adults. Panelists participate via self-administered web surveys. Panelists who do not have internet access at home are provided with a tablet and wireless internet connection. Interviews are conducted in both […]

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September 16, 2020 Acknowledgments

The American News Pathways project was made possible by The Pew Charitable Trusts. Pew Research Center is a subsidiary of The Pew Charitable Trusts, its primary funder. This initiative is a collaborative effort based on the input and analysis of the following individuals. Find related reports online at https://www.pewresearch.org/topics/election-news-pathways/. Research Team Amy Mitchell, Director, Journalism […]

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September 16, 2020 Appendix: Grouping respondents by major news sources

The survey asked whether respondents use any of eight news sources as a major source, minor source or not a source for political and election news. (Responses for all eight sources are available here.) The sources identified as major sources were combined with the respondents’ partisanship to identify those who get news from only sources […]

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