How Climate Change Impacts Indigenous Lands

How Climate Change Impacts Indigenous Lands

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How Climate Change Impacts Indigenous Lands
Near the eastern shore of Maryland, the Nause-Waiwash people have lived in harmony with their land for years. This land and the species that calls it home are now threatened by rising sea levels. According to Chief Donna Wolf Mother Abbott, "Mother Earth is in distress." Chief Abbott tells the story of her community and how they have been impacted by climate change. She explains what it'll take to protect their ancestral land for future generations.

Learn more about how rising sea levels are impacting this area by listening to "Ocean, People, Planet" from the "After the Fact" podcast

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