Technology has changed how people consume news, as well as the process of gathering it.  Information is now almost instantaneous and available anywhere in the world.  And news has been democratized so that voices outside the mainstream can be heard.

This is healthy for democracy but is an earthquake for the business of journalism.  Newspaper circulation is dropping, newsroom staffs are shrinking, and ad revenue is declining.  Pew tracks these changes through its annual state of the news media reports, providing fact-based analysis of the growth of digital news sites, the purchase of major journalism institutions by entrepreneurs, the use of mobile devices to access news, the mixing of news and marketing through sponsor-generated content, and other trends in journalism.

Recent Work

March 18, 2020 3. Within party, media diet makes a difference in thoughts and perceptions about COVID-19

One striking area of difference within each party lies in the news sources people turn to for political news. The first survey conducted for Pew Research Center’s Election News Pathways project asked respondents whether they got political news in the past week from each of 30 different news outlets. Researchers then grouped Democrats and Republicans […]

The post 3. Within party, media diet makes a difference in thoughts and perceptions about COVID-19 appeared first on Pew Research Center's Journalism Project.

March 18, 2020 2. Knowledge and perception surrounding COVID-19

Made-up news about the coronavirus has ranged from fake cures to false news reports to conspiracy theories. These efforts seem to have had at least some impact on the American public. About half of U.S. adults (48%) report seeing at least some made-up news or information regarding the outbreak of COVID-19, with 12% saying they […]

The post 2. Knowledge and perception surrounding COVID-19 appeared first on Pew Research Center's Journalism Project.

March 18, 2020 1. Majorities think the news media have done a good job overall covering COVID-19 but have exaggerated the risks

Americans are paying very close attention to news about COVID-19, the new strain of coronavirus that is upending daily lives and wreaking havoc on the stock market. About half of U.S. adults (51%) say they are following this news very closely, and another 38% are following it fairly closely. This high level of attention cuts […]

The post 1. Majorities think the news media have done a good job overall covering COVID-19 but have exaggerated the risks appeared first on Pew Research Center's Journalism Project.

March 18, 2020 Americans Immersed in COVID-19 News; Most Think Media Are Doing Fairly Well Covering It

About half say they have seen at least some made-up news about the virus; 29% think it was created in a lab.

The post Americans Immersed in COVID-19 News; Most Think Media Are Doing Fairly Well Covering It appeared first on Pew Research Center's Journalism Project.

March 11, 2020 Black and white Democrats differ in their media diets, assessments of primaries

There are notable differences between white and black Democrats in news consumption habits and assessments of recent political events and figures in the news.

The post Black and white Democrats differ in their media diets, assessments of primaries appeared first on Pew Research Center's Journalism Project.

March 11, 2020 Election News Pathways Methodology

Data in the Election News Pathways project is drawn from The American Trends Panel, a nationally representative panel of randomly selected U.S. adults. Read for more information about this survey's methodology.

The post Election News Pathways Methodology appeared first on Pew Research Center's Journalism Project.

March 4, 2020 About one-fifth of Democrats and Republicans get political news in a kind of media bubble

In total, 20% of all Democrats get political news only from outlets with left-leaning audiences, while 18% of all Republicans do so only from outlets with right-leaning audiences.

The post About one-fifth of Democrats and Republicans get political news in a kind of media bubble appeared first on Pew Research Center's Journalism Project.