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Project

Pew Latin American Fellows

Meet the 2019 Class

The Pew Latin American Fellows Program in the Biomedical Sciences provides support for young scientists from Latin America to receive postdoctoral training in the United States. The program gives these individuals an opportunity to further their scientific knowledge by promoting exchange and collaboration between investigators in the United States and Latin America resulting in advances in research in Latin America.

Learn more about the application process for the 2021 class of awards from our FAQ. If you’d like additional information on the most recent class of awardees,  please visit the fellows directory.

Our Work

Fact Sheet

Frequently Asked Questions about the Pew Latin American Fellows Program

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Fact Sheet

The Pew Latin American Fellows Program in the Biomedical Sciences provides funding for scientists to receive postdoctoral training at leading research institutions in the United States. Through the program, The Pew Charitable Trusts has supported more than 200 outstanding young researchers, strengthening scientific communities across borders. Fellows who complete the two-year program and return to Latin America to establish their own labs get an additional grant. About 7 in 10 of the program’s participants have taken advantage of this incentive and are conducting work on regional and global health challenges across Latin America.

Trust Magazine
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How Pew’s Biomedical Scholars Drive Cutting-Edge Science to New Heights

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How Pew’s Biomedical Scholars Drive Cutting-Edge Science to New Heights

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Podcast

Scientists at Work: Craig Mello on the Mysteries of Genetic Code

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Podcast

How does genetic information transmit across generations? While trying to find out, scientists Craig Mello and Andrew Fire quite by accident made a discovery in 1998 that would earn them a Nobel Prize—and pave the way for the first drug to take on harmful genes. Pew’s Dan LeDuc talks with Mello about science’s surprises.