Project

Public Health Data Improvement

Public Health Data Improvement
State and local public health officials need timely, comprehensive health data from hospitals, doctors’ offices, and clinical labs to detect and respond to disease hot spots, contaminated food and water, and populations experiencing inequitable health outcomes such as higher rates of environmentally triggered conditions like asthma.

The work of these officials saves lives and helps improve the overall health of their communities. Unfortunately, public health agencies often don’t receive critical information from health care providers—and, even when they do, they may not have all the tools they need to analyze the data and take action.

Pew conducts research, provides technical assistance, and advocates for policies, resources, and public health department practices to enable the rapid and effective use of health care data to advance Americans’ well-being.

Doctors’ offices and hospitals in the United States log about a billion patient visits each year, generating data on diseases, injuries, and treatment outcomes. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic began in 2019, however, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that as few as 1 in 10 cases of diseases and conditions that are required to be shared with public health agencies were actually submitted by health care providers.

Even when cases are reported, important data such as patients’ race, ethnicity, or contact information is often missing, meaning that officials can’t track the impact of diseases on different communities or conduct activities to slow their spread. As was demonstrated during the coronavirus pandemic, many health departments still receive critical information via faxes and phone calls, not electronically—delaying analysis and response time. Improving these systems is vital to supporting vibrant, healthy communities throughout the country, and to prepare for future public health crises.

Pew works to:

  1. Advocate for state and federal policies requiring that electronic health record systems automatically send standardized patient data to health agencies.
  2. Build the evidence base to demonstrate the benefits of improving electronic data sharing for public health.
  3. Research and share best practices to help public health agencies analyze and effectively use health care data.
Unsplash
Unsplash
Article

Improve Data Exchange Practices to Promote Public Health

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Article

As state health departments continue their COVID-19 vaccination efforts and work to halt the virus’s spread, a lack of critical data undermines their ability to effectively accomplish either task, a reality that could prolong the pandemic.

Vaccine administration
Vaccine administration
Opinion

Biden Can Improve Health Data Sharing For COVID-19

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Opinion

Case numbers, hospitalizations, and widespread loss of life have shown that the United States was not fully prepared for the COVID-19 pandemic on many fronts, including the inability to quickly share test results and data on the spread and severity of the virus.

OUR WORK