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Project

Public Sector Retirement Systems

Public Sector Retirement Systems
Many state and local retirement plans are on an unsustainable course, having failed to set aside enough money to fund the promises they have made.  To inform state policymaking, Pew provides  research on the fiscal challenges state and cities face as a result of their pension and retiree health promises.

With the understanding that there is no one-size-fits-all solution, the project also offers technical assistance to states and municipalities as they undertake pension and retiree health care reforms to ensure their public sector retirement systems are affordable and sustainable, provide a secure retirement for workers, and preserve governments' ability to recruit and retain a talented public-sector workforce.

Issue Brief

The State Pension Funding Gap: 2016

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Issue Brief

Many state retirement systems are on an unsustainable course, coming up short on their investment targets and having failed to set aside enough money to fund the pension promises made to public employees. Even as contributions from taxpayers over the past decade doubled as a share of state revenue, the total still fell short of what is needed to improve the funding situation.

Article

Why Pew Works with States on Pension Reforms

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Article

A conversation about Pew's pension work with Project Director Greg Mennis

Issue Brief

Kentucky's Successful Public Pension Reform

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Issue Brief

A bipartisan effort in Kentucky in 2013 resulted in a fair and effective retirement system for employees and taxpayers alike.

Fact Sheet

Providing Support for Public Sector Retirement Systems

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Fact Sheet

The Pew Charitable Trusts performs 50-state and major city research on all aspects of public pension systems, including their fiscal health, investment practices, benefits design, and governance. Pew’s project on public sector retirement systems developed some of the first and most comprehensive studies of underfunded public pensions throughout the United States. This fact sheet updates guidance on our work initially published in 2015.