Editor's Picks From Around the Web

  • August 28, 2015

NV: ACLU sues to try to stop Nevada’s school voucher program


The American Civil Liberties Union argues in a lawsuit that Nevada’s new school vouchers program violates state laws that prohibit public money to be used for religious purposes. The program creates “educational savings accounts” that allow parents to pull a child from public schools and take tax dollars with them to pay for private or parochial school.

US: Federal judge blocks EPA’s ‘waters’ rule from taking effect


States opposed to a new clean water rule expanding federal jurisdiction over state waters claimed a temporary victory when a federal judge blocked the rule from taking effect on Friday. The judge issued an injunction sought by North Dakota and a dozen other states, saying the Environmental Protection Agency exceeded its constitutional authority.

LA: Corps must pay full $3 billion cost of restoring Louisiana wetlands


The Army Corps of Engineers must pay the full $3 billion cost of restoring wetlands destroyed by the agency's improper construction and maintenance of the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet, a federal judge in New Orleans ruled. The judged ruled the corps improperly tried to stick Louisiana with 35 percent of the restoration cost.

CA: Despite ongoing drought, California farmers make money


California farmers sold a record $54 billion worth of crops and animal products last year. Revenue was high, despite the drought, because prices were high and growers were able to pump water from underground aquifers.

AR: Atheists vow to put up 'no-gods' statue at Arkansas Capitol


If Christians post the Ten Commandments at the state Capitol, instructing Arkansans to honor "the LORD thy God," then atheists say they want to erect a monument declaring "There are no gods."

IN: ACLU challenges Indiana’s ‘ballot selfie law’


The American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana is challenging the new law banning voters who want to take photos of their ballots and share them with others, saying it impinges on a person’s First Amendment rights.

OK: Oklahoma state school board issues 503 emergency teaching certificates


Members of the state Board of Education approved 503 requests for emergency teaching certificates in August, a sign Oklahoma's teacher shortage is not letting up.

AZ: Arizona cuts ties with private-prison operator over Kingman riot


Republican Gov. Doug Ducey is terminating a contract with the operator of a private prison that he said “failed” to control riots last month that badly damaged the Arizona facility and injured 16 people.

WI: Marijuana decriminalization spreads across Wisconsin in spite of state law


Cities across Wisconsin have been decriminalizing simple marijuana possession by adopting local ordinances that only levy fines against those caught with small amounts of pot, despite a state law that says anyone caught with a small amount of marijuana can be charged with a misdemeanor punishable by jail time and a permanent criminal record.

MO: Missouri municipal courts reform bill takes effect


The new law, prompted by the fatal shooting last year of teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, lowers the limit on how much of a city’s annual revenue can come from traffic tickets and other fines and imposes other restrictions on municipal court actions.

KY: Kentucky clerk again defies court order over same-sex marriage licenses


Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis continued to withhold marriage licenses from local residents a day after a federal appeals court upheld an order telling the Kentucky clerk to end her protest of the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling that legalized gay marriage.

MT: Polygamists ask judge to strike down Montana's bigamy laws


A Montana man, his wife and his common-law wife filed a federal lawsuit that seeks to strike down the state’s bigamy laws, arguing they unconstitutionally prevent them from legitimizing their polygamous relationship based on the principles set forth by the Supreme Court ruling on same sex marriage.