Flood-Prepared Communities
Project

Flood-Prepared Communities

Flooding is the most common and costly natural disaster in the U.S., significantly affecting homes, businesses, infrastructure, and the environment. Since 2000, flood-related disasters in the U.S. accounted for more than $850 billion in damage and losses.

Pew aims to reduce these impacts by improving policies and planning at the federal and state levels to:

  • Enhance pre-disaster mitigation: Directing more resources toward and increasing the use of proactive approaches, such as removing properties from flood-prone areas, increasing green space, and restoring and protecting flood plains, will limit the effects and cost of floods.
  • Ensure infrastructure is flood-ready: Updating the nation’s roads, bridges, schools, hospitals, and other critical infrastructure to better withstand future flood events will help improve community resilience and reduce taxpayer losses.
  • Establish flood-resilient states: Systematic planning and adoption of nature-based solutions to address flood risks will reduce the severity of floods, boost states’ ability to withstand future storms, and lower disaster costs.
  • Modernize federal flood insurance: Reforming the National Flood Insurance Program to reflect current and future threats; remove incentives for development in flood-prone areas; and break the costly cycle of flooding, damage, and repair will help the program better meet its goals of lowering federal spending on disaster response and rebuilding.
FEMA is completing aerial preliminary damage assessments over Tennessee following the severe storms and floods that have damaged or destroyed homes and businesses in April 2010
FEMA is completing aerial preliminary damage assessments over Tennessee following the severe storms and floods that have damaged or destroyed homes and businesses in April 2010
Article

Green Infrastructure Makes Communities More Resilient

Quick View
Article

Mayor Holden spoke with Pew about Dyersburg’s experience and how the use of natural mitigation measures and support from the state can strengthen the resiliency of other towns.

Our Work

Flooded street
Flooded street
Fact Sheet

How Pew Helps Build Flood-Resilient States

Quick View
Fact Sheet

Flood-related disasters have cost the United States more than $900 billion in damage and economic losses since 2000 and have affected every state. Experts expect future flood events to be more prevalent and severe, challenging all levels of government to manage increasingly devastating impacts.

Article

Mitigation Matters: Policy Solutions to Reduce Local Flood Risk

Quick View
Article

Since 2000, floods have cost the United States more than $845 billion in damage to homes, businesses, and critical infrastructure. The expense of adapting to more frequent and severe storms is projected to rise over the next several decades, placing a premium on the need to take action now to reduce the impacts of future floods.

It's Time to Make U.S. Infrastructure Flood-Ready