Stateline

What We're Reading: Top State Stories 9/21

What We're Reading: Top State Stories 9/21

US: Federal agency says it lost track of 1,488 migrant children

apnews.com

Twice in less than a year, the federal government has lost track of nearly 1,500 migrant children after placing them in the homes of sponsors across the country, federal officials have acknowledged.

OR: ACLU urges Oregon to leave bail bond industry out of pension investments

oregonlive.com

The American Civil Liberties Union is calling on Oregon's pension fund managers to stop investing in private equity funds run by Portland-based Endeavour Capital until the firm stops investing in the "exploitive" bail bonds industry.

DC: D.C. is a ‘sanctuary city,’ but that status stops at the courthouse door

wamu.org

Immigration advocates say the District of Columbia — which officials have declared a “sanctuary city” — has fallen short on resisting Immigration and Customs Enforcement. And the Superior Court that serves as D.C.’s local courthouse is funded by the federal government and staffed by the federal U.S. Marshals Service. 

CA: California doctors must disclose sexual misconduct under new law

latimes.com

The Medical Board of California has an online registry that lists when physicians are on probation and the reasons for the disciplinary action, but the onus has been on patients to research a doctor’s record. Under the new law, physicians on probation after July 1, 2019, must alert clients about their status before an appointment.

CT: Connecticut doctors say info exchange would help fight opioid epidemic

ctmirror.org

As Connecticut residents continue to die from opioid overdoses at an alarming rate, there is some consensus in the medical community that being able to share health records electronically across the entire state would help fight the epidemic. A system to accommodate that sharing remains elusive, however.

IL: Illinois House speaker: ‘I didn’t do enough’ on sexual harassment

chicagotribune.com

Democratic Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan wrote he “didn’t do enough” to ensure people could report sexual harassment at the Capitol, where complaints continue to cloud state politics. He pledged to do more on the issue.

WY: Effort to allow mail-in ballots in Wyoming clears hurdle

trib.com

A proposed bill to allow Wyoming counties to move to mail-in ballot elections has passed out of committee, but whether it finds support in the full Legislature next session remains to be seen.

NH: New Hampshire residents can now play the lottery online

newhampshire.com

New Hampshire lottery officials rolled out the first online products offered in the state this week, making New Hampshire the sixth state to offer draw and instant-win tickets over the internet. The state Legislature passed a bill in June 2017 authorizing online lottery sales.

MI: Michigan considers using National Guard to finish stalled roadwork

detroitnews.com

The state of Michigan is considering calling on the National Guard to complete stalled roadwork amid a breakdown in talks aimed at lifting a lockout of road engineers.

IA: Iowa privatization of Medicaid nearly triples cost-increase per enrollee

desmoinesregister.com

The average cost of insuring an Iowan on Medicaid has climbed nearly three times as fast since the state hired private companies to manage the program, when compared with the previous six years, new state figures show. 

AZ: Arizona moves to revoke licenses for immigrant children housing

apnews.com

Arizona officials have moved to revoke the licenses for a nonprofit that houses immigrant children after it missed a deadline to show that all its employees passed background checks. The state has investigated several reports of sexual abuse of immigrant children.

LA: Minimum age law for Louisiana strippers still a no-go

apnews.com

A federal appeals court decision means authorities in Louisiana still cannot enforce a state law setting 21 as the minimum age for exotic dancers who wear next to nothing in bars and nightclubs.

VT: Vermont wants all school drinking water tested for lead

vtdigger.com

Officials do not recommend a mandate, saying that Vermont does not have the capacity to provide comprehensive testing at every school. In a pilot program, at least three taps in every school, or 17 percent of taps tested, had lead levels higher than the American Academy of Pediatrics recommended maximum of 1 ppb.

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